averse

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averse

Botany (of leaves, flowers, etc.) turned away from the main stem
References in periodicals archive ?
There are fluctuations up and down in the Brady yield spreads, but junk bond spreads are continuing to open up; all of the short-term measures of risk aversion are still opening up.
An individual who exhibits greater risk aversion than that in Equation (1) has a utility function, V, which is defined as k(U) where k is a twice-differentiable concave function.
4926, rose against a weaker dollar last Monday, with surging stocks reflecting an easing of risk aversion and investors showing little immediate reaction to fiscal measures in the government's pre-budget report.
These factors include the degree of risk aversion in preferences, the actuarial fairness/unfairness of market insurance terms, and an individual's subjective evaluations of incomes in different states of nature.
Following the procedures set forth in the accompanying "User's Guide for Risk Preference Parameters" (2007) gives a mean risk aversion, [[gamma].
The risk aversion that drove gold prices higher earlier in the quarter turned negative for the metal as a slide in other assets prompted selling to cover losses elsewhere.
Gold, for one, might fare better given that underlying demand for the metal is not all based on risk aversion.
In the current conditions of high risk aversion and market nervousness, aggravated by the neglect of global structural problems in favour of cosmetic remedies, we recommend staying with shortatoamedium duration liquid names with good/proven credit history.
48 during early European trading, as risk aversion boosted the demand for yen.
24 during the Asian trade, while the New Zealand dollar lost ground following the rise in risk aversion.
This is the first study showing that gender differences in financial risk aversion have a biological basis, and that differences in testosterone levels between individuals can affect important aspects of economic behaviour and career decisions," said Prof Dario Maestripieri, one of the study leaders.
While there has long been debate about the social and biological differences between men and women, new research by the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, the University of Chicago's Department of Comparative Human Development and the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, explores how the hormone testosterone plays an important role in gender differences in financial risk aversion and career choice.

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