road capacity


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road capacity

[′rōd kə‚pas·əd·ē]
(civil engineering)
The maximum traffic flow obtainable on a given roadway, using all available lanes, usually expressed in vehicles per hour or vehicles per day.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "Members of the IoD in the North East rank transport connectivity as their number one issue, so a 50mph limit seems a price worth paying if it results in improved trac ow and road capacity.
The modifications will result in improving traffic flow around the mall, increasing the road capacity, and relieving congestion whilst boosting safety.
I'm rather curious as to whether, given the relative remoteness of 'our' proposed new hospital in Wynyard, the journey time and A19 road capacity, particularly in winter months, has been factored in.
Works undertaken included an increase of lanes from three to four and from two to three at some points, adjusting ground lines, adding traffic signals in addition to asphalt surface removal and placement of a new asphalt layer in order to boost the road capacity to withstand the expected increase in the number of vehicles," DoT said in a press statement.
He said that during last few years' traffic has been increased and road capacity is not enough to keep the flow on.
The road aims to improve traffic flow, increase road capacity, reduce congestion and enhance road safety standards, said a Ministry statement.
We need to add more capacity - both road capacity and public transportation capacity - but we also have to operate that really efficiently," says Lomax.
This would make, for example, left-turning movements along the length of Newport Road much safer, as well as increasing the road capacity and reducing delays.
For example, in some parts of the country, dramatic population growth has occurred without a corresponding increase in road capacity, placing enormous pressure on roads that, in many cases, were built 50 years ago.
Instead it proposes for the short term to increase road capacity to cut congestion and carbon dioxide emissions, focus on producing leaner petrol and diesel engines; and make smaller and lighter cars.
James Hookham, FTA policy director, added: "Government reluctance to invest in sufficient road capacity and UK transport infrastructure means that sooner or later an alternative to managing the road network through traffic queues has got to be found.
Road File 2008/09 (published 30 October 2008) reports that motorists receive only GBP4 billion investment in road capacity yet contribute GBP46 billion a year in road user taxes.