romeite


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romeite

[′rō·mē‚īt]
(mineralogy)
(Ca,Fe,Mn,Na)2(Sb,Ti)2O6(O,OH,F) A honey-yellow to yellowish-brown mineral composed of oxide of calcium, iron, manganese, sodium, antimony, and titanium, occurring in minute octahedrons.
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the Cervandone area with its rare, often arsenic-bearing minerals such as cafarsite, gasparite-(Ce), tilasite, chernovite-(Y), cervandonite-(Ce), asbecasite, and paraniite-(Y); the Simplon tunnel; the Pestarena gold mine (one of the main sources of gold in Western Europe at the beginning of the 20th century); the Brosso and Traversella mines; the Candoglia quarries, source of the marble used to build the famous Milan cathedral and type locality of paracelsian, taramellite and wenkite; the pyrope-coesite-quartzite outcrops of Dora-Maira massif, source of six IMA-approved new species; and the eclogitized manganese deposit of Prabornaz (Praborna), type locality for braunite, piemontite, romeite, strontiomelane, and manganiandrosite-(Ce).
The name was used long ago for a mineral which was shown to be romeite and now has been approved by the CNMMN IMA for the present use.