rhodiola rosea

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rhodiola
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rhodiola

rhodiola

Delicious adaptogenic herb that normally grows in cold areas. One of the premiere life-prolonging adaptogens of the world. Used to increase endorphin levels to feel good (mood elevator), help prevent stress, depression, promotes mental clarity, oxygenation and blood supply to cells, helps nervous conditions, headaches, GI upset, chronic fatigue. Studies show it changes serotonin and dopamine levels. Being an adaptogen, it doesn’t cause stimulation burnout. Good for anyone going through lots of physical and emotional stress, plus mental fatigue. Also used to increase Nitric Oxide in smooth muscles and penile artery walls (better erections). Good for all endurance sports.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is true for Sri Lanka (where a Christian led the Tamil rebellion and initiated the advent of suicide attacks), Ireland, South Africa, Lebanon, Vietnam, and much of Latin America (see also Robert Pape "Dying to Win" and Martin Roseroot "Pious Passion").
Plants like dwarf willow and birch, juniper, roseroot, mountain sorrel and purple saxifrage thrived.
A 1993 expansion proposal is being considered under recently initiated comprehensive conservation planning for the refuge to include counties in Minnesota where the threatened Leedy's roseroot (Sedum integrifolium spp.
The star of these plants is without a doubt roseroot (Rhodiola atropurpurea), a sort of ginseng known as Chukchi cabbage, which was for a long time their preferred plant foodstuff, together with the leaves of dwarf willows (Salix arctica, S.
rosea), also known as roseroot or golden root, belongs to the family Crassulaceae (Darbinyan et al.
Crassulaceae) is an adaptogen plant also known as golden root, roseroot or arctic root.
Future visitors might well see plants such as the Welsh p0ppy, roseroot and mossy saxifrage growing on the lower slopes of Cwm Cau, having spread out from their restricted cliffs.
rosea, the resistance to hydrogen peroxide in exponential phase yeast cells, which were grown without and in the presence of roseroot extracts, was compared.