rostrum

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rostrum

1. a platform or dais in front of an orchestra on which the conductor stands
2. another word for ram (sense 4)
3. the prow or beak of an ancient Roman ship
4. Biology Zoology a beak or beaklike part

Rostrum

 

(1) In fish, the anterior part of the neurocranium, located in front of the olfactory capsules. The rostrum is especially prominent as an integral cartilaginous process in Acipen-seridae, for example, in the stellate sturgeon (Acipenser stellatus) and Scaphirhyncus, and in chondrichthians, for example, in the sawfish and saw shark. In the smooth hound and other fish the rostrum is represented by three separate outgrowths. In the sawfish and saw shark large cutaneous teeth (placoid scales) are located along the sides of the rostrum; in these animals, the rostrum resembles a saw and serves as a weapon of defense and attack. In the majority of Batoidei the anterior edges of the pectoral fins are attached to the rostrum. The rostrum is reduced in many contemporary bony fishes and in terrestrial vertebrates.

(2) In reptiles and birds, the anterior process of the basisphe-noid bone. The rostrum is formed by the concrescence of the integumentary sphenoid bone to the basisphenoid bone.

rostrum

[′rä·strəm]
(biology)
A beak or beaklike process.

rostrum

A platform, elevated area, pulpit, or the like for addressing an audience.
References in classic literature ?
drag the lecturer off the rostrum, and the male mutual instructor out of the class, and ease their poor addled heads of evenings by making them dance and sing with you.
Nor was Hugh by any means a passive follower, who scrupled to act without precise and definite orders; for when Mr Tappertit mounted on an empty cask which stood by way of rostrum in the room, and volunteered a speech upon the alarming crisis then at hand, he placed himself beside the orator, and though he grinned from ear to ear at every word he said, threw out such expressive hints to scoffers in the management of his cudgel, that those who were at first the most disposed to interrupt, became remarkably attentive, and were the loudest in their approbation.
Mr Boffin, as if he were about to have his portrait painted, or to be electrified, or to be made a Freemason, or to be placed at any other solitary disadvantage, ascended the rostrum prepared for him.