rotten

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rotten

1. affected with rot; decomposing, decaying, or putrid
2. (of rocks, soils, etc.) soft and crumbling, esp as a result of weathering
References in periodicals archive ?
Do they want more of the parties that allowed this corruption and rottenness to happen in the first place?
It is half-rotten, and its flowers spring from the rottenness under it, just as the moss on those eaves does from the rotting shingles.
Earth is rich in rottenness of things A soothing tang of compost filters Through yeasting seeds, rain-sodden And festive fermentation, a sweetness Velvety as mead and maggots (142)
Surprisingly, Aquinas on this Psalm can sound more Calvinistic than Calvin: "It is marvelous that anyone so great would tie Himself to someone small by a special familiarity: and thereby the Psalmist first commemorates the littleness of man out of the condition what is man, since he is such a small thing: Job 14: Man, born of a woman: and 25: Man that is rottenness and the son of man who is a worm.
The rottenness is emanating from the Celtic board to the management and playing staff.
He begins by stating that the author of the play is an Algerian who wants "to display the alienating surrender [desherence] and rottenness [mal etre] of Harki children.
4) Indeed, it appears that the central theme of pathological insanity has a wider resonance and refers to the general disease of contemporary society, the rottenness we also encounter in the other four stories of The Wall.
Tolkien described Mordor as a vast wasteland: "Here nothing lived, not even the leprous growths that feed on rottenness.
In support of this hypothesis Gorender of the Caribbean Times (10) says Long Walk is "[one] of those masterpieces, perhaps the greatest of the 20th century autobiographical literature, which is a sharp, poignant, elegant and eloquent counter to the prevailing cynicism about the rottenness of politics".
temple of beauty on the outside and rottenness on the inside.
Working almost like a journalist, Brough had developed an ear fine-tuned to the rottenness.