rouge

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Rouge

(ro͞ozh), river, c.30 mi (50 km) long, rising in S Michigan and winding S and SE to the Detroit River at the city of River Rouge. Dearborn and part of Detroit also lie on the river, which carries much of the raw material used by Detroit's industries.

rouge:

see cosmeticscosmetics,
preparations externally applied to change or enhance the beauty of skin, hair, nails, lips, and eyes. The use of body paint for ornamental and religious purposes has been common among primitive peoples from prehistoric times (see body-marking).
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Rõuge

 

the site of fortified and unfortified towns of the sixth through 11th centuries in Võru Raion, Estonian SSR, in the vicinity of a population center of the same name. Rõuge is located on the slope of an ancient runoff valley (Rõuge Valley of Lakes), which was formed in the period before the Ice Age and in the period after the Ice Age. Archaeological excavations conducted in the area from 1951 to 1959 by the Soviet archaeologist M. Kh. Shmidekhel’m uncovered the remains of dwellings, hearths, and pottery. The inhabitants of Rõuge engaged in farming, cattle breeding, and the working of metal, bone, and stone.

REFERENCE

Shmidekhel’m, M. Kh. “Gorodishche Ryuge ν iugo-vostochnoi Estonii.” In Tr. Pribaltiiskoi ob”edinennoi kompleksnoi ekspeditsii, vol. I. Moscow, 1959.

rouge

[′rüzh]
(materials)
Finely divided, hydrated iron oxide, used in polishing glass, metal, or gems, and as a pigment.
References in classic literature ?
A touch of rouge carefully applied destroyed the hopes of the Chevalier de Valois; could that nobleman perish in any other way?
Sir Leicester glancing, with magnificent displeasure, at the rouge and the pearl necklace.
Sir Leicester, with his magnificent glance of displeasure at the rouge, appears to say so too.
Her wild eyes, made wilder still by the blurred stains of rouge below them, half washed away--her disheveled hair, with streaks of gray showing through the dye--presented a spectacle which would have been grotesque under other circumstances, but which now reminded Emily of Mr.
This Sir Gaston is a very worthy man," said he to his squires as they rode from the "Baton Rouge.
In absolute repose, if one could forget her mass of unnaturally golden hair, the forced and constant smile, the too liberal use of rouge and powder, the nervous motions of her head, it was easily to be realised that there were still neglected attractions about her face and figure.