rough air

rough air

[′rəf ′er]
(aerospace engineering)
An aviation term for turbulence encountered in flight.
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Even so, the upstart carriers face more rough air ahead as diplomatic tensions between Tokyo and neighbours China and South Korea weigh on travel demand between the regional rivals.
It's the sort of rough air that would have me, the classic nervous passenger, uttering prayers and tightening the seat belt but Denzel's pilot calmly shrugs it all off.
I've been on planes that have been struck by lightning and hit some pretty rough air.
Another system still experiencing similar rough air, the Joint Strike Fighter F-35 aircraft is now beginning to be received by operational squadrons.
It was very difficult to balance how many laps you had left and how much life you had left in the tyres, and pushing behind him, he was in clean air and I was in rough air, and the car was sliding so much.
The problem is, across Iowa in the afternoon in the summer you get a lot of thunderstorms and a lot of really rough air," said Dr.
Flight 2196 was making its final approach, flying at an altitude of around 5,500 meters over the Pacific Ocean, around 100 kilometers south-southeast of the airport, when it encountered the rough air, the Land, Infrastructure and Transport Ministry's office at Narita airport said.
7) International Carriers Hit Turbulence Most international carriers' rankings flew into rough air in the last three years, with Korean Air losing nearly three points in its sureyor ratings, and even standard-bearers like British Airways, Air France, Lufthansa, SAS and Swissair dropping by over 1.