rumination

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rumination

[‚rü·mə′nā·shən]
(medicine)
Voluntary regurgitation of food from the stomach, followed by remastication and swallowing in emotionally or mentally disturbed persons. Also known as merycism.
(physiology)
Regurgitation and remastication of food in preparation for true digestion in ruminants.
(psychology)
An obsessional preoccupation with a single idea or system of ideas.
References in periodicals archive ?
These analyses reveal that the more intrusions people experience, the more they ruminate about these intrusions, which brings about depressive symptoms.
Van Dyke says readers and writers for Ruminate range from a pheasant farmer in Montana to a grandmother in Florida.
It allows us to ruminate over our preparedness to be allies, advocates, and diversity change agents dedicated to the creation of a more welcoming and inclusive institutional environment.
But you can just like take it home with you and just ruminate.
The collection illuminates life so you can ruminate about its sweetness and richness (hence the "chocolate" in the title).
commented in the press that this offers a biologic basis for why women have a greater tendency to ruminate on emotional events--and perhaps to develop depression as well.
Rather than wrestle with these inquiries, Ashcroft simply admitted that he didn't know, stressing instead that there wasn't any time to ruminate on such trifles.
Kotsakis ruminate on the development of social distinctions among households and villages.
Sharif serves his sentence, he can ruminate over the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune.
Rather, readers, especially the theologically uncultivated, should ingest small daily portions of the work, allowing time to ruminate.
While hanging around in this highclass neighborhood, let us ruminate on twin transgressions that involve antique possessives.
Those who exhibited insane behavior were harshly treated; "one has to abandon immediately any romantic notion" of the insane "being permitted to gambol on the village green or ruminate idly in the shade of the oak tree," according to Shorter.