runoff rate

runoff rate

[′rən‚ȯf ‚rāt]
(hydrology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Eqn 15 is used to define an effective runoff rate so that a single effective runoff rate for any event is related to the average sediment concentration for the event in the same way as the instantaneous sediment concentration and runoff rate are related.
We also examined 3 different ways of determining the soil erodibility parameter for the same storm event using: (i) hydrographs estimated from rainfall intensities and runoff amounts; (ii) an effective runoff rate calculated from the hydrograph; (iii) an estimate of the effective runoff rate based on a scaling technique involving the peak rainfall intensity and the gross runoff coefficient.
Non-operating/ excess balances are assigned a 40% runoff rate for corporations and government entities and 100% for financial institutions, making them the least valuable to banks.
Estimation and determination of runoff rate and properties of the desired watershed make the optimized use of water resources possible and facilitate the planning of watershed activities as well as the design of water structures of rivers and streams.
The increasing trend in runoff rate of TH varied during different times of the year, increased by 44% from October to February in the winter flow, by 24% in the spring flow and by 27% in the summer flow, but the streamflow decreased in BH.
A series of computer programs were used to retrieve data and calculate total rain, rainfall intensity, runoff rate, and total runoff for each event.
Averaged over both runoff events, the compost blanket and 2:1 blanket reduced the average peak runoff rate by 43%, the 1:2 blanket by 38%, the 1:2 blanket with clover by 47%, the wood mulch blanket by 26%, and the straw blanket with PAM by 21%.
The graduated buffer significantly reduced the peak runoff rate by 14% compared with the single height buffer.
The design of soil conservation structures, reservoirs, spillways, and channels must be based on runoff rate and/or volume.
Measuring runoff rate and periodically collecting either a single composite sample or several sequential samples is the typical way to determine soil loss.
In a rural area the runoff rate might be only 10 percent; in a more urban, downtown situation that percentage can easily soar to 55 or 60 percent or greater.