ROM

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ROM

Computing
read only memory: a storage device that holds data permanently and cannot in normal circumstances be altered by the programmer

rom

[räm]
(electricity)
A unit of electrical conductivity, equal to the conductivity of a material in which an electric field of 1 volt per meter gives rise to a current density of 1 ampere per square meter. Derived from reciprocal ohm meter.

ROM

[räm]
(computer science)

ROM

ROM

(1) In an Android phone, a file for firmware updating. See Android ROM.

(2) (Read Only Memory) A memory chip that permanently stores instructions and data. Also known as "mask ROM," its content is created in the last masking stage of the chip manufacturing process, and it cannot be changed. Stand-alone ROM chips and ROM banks in microcontroller chips are used to hold control routines for myriad applications. ROMs were also widely used to hold the BIOS in early PCs as well as plug-in cartridges for video games.

Although EPROMs, EEPROMs, and particularly flash memory, are the kinds of non-volatile storage one hears about more often, ROM is a mature, inexpensive technology that is easy to integrate into the design of any CMOS chip.

ROMs Are Secure
Unlike flash memory, which can be updated, the data in ROM chips cannot be tampered with. If encryption keys and other security codes are stored in a ROM, they cannot be altered unless the chip is physically replaced (see secure boot). See memory types, RAM, EEPROM and flash memory.


ROMs Are Everywhere
Cartridges that contain nothing more than a ROM chip are widely used to hold games and educational programs. The yellow ROM cartridge in this image (bottom right) contains a program for the LeapPad Learning System for preschoolers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Preterm premature rupture of membranes vaginal abnormal effects on maternal and infant outcomes (in Chinese).
When reviewing the clinical files, rupture of membranes was confirmed by either visualisation of amniotic fluid in the vagina on speculum examination, a convincing history of drainage of amniotic fluid, plus reduced amniotic fluid index on ultrasound scan or by observing persistent amniotic fluid staining of sanitary pads.
Expectant management of rupture of membranes at term.
According to the latest guidelines, (3,4) when considering the unknown status of GBS colonization, 21 (81%) women met the criteria for receiving IAP (12 had premature labor; six had premature labor and rupture of membranes [greater than or equal to]18h; two had premature labor, rupture of membranes [greater than or equal to]18h and fever during labor; and one had term labor and rupture of membrane [greater than or equal to]18h).
The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) currently recommends delivery for all women with rupture of membranes after 34 weeks' gestation, while acknowledging that this recommendation is based on "limited and inconsistent scientific evidence.
Although with expectant management the risk of maternal and neonatal infection is higher as shown by various studies; on the other hand it has also been shown that expectant management has low rates of caesarean section; provided the spontaneous labour starts within 24 hours after rupture of membranes.
Aim of our study is therefore to compare the effects of induction of labor with PGE2 versus expectant management, on maternal and fetal well-being, in women with term prelabor rupture of membranes.
Neonatal outcome and prenatalantibiotic treatment in premature rupture of membranes.
It can be a challenge to accurately diagnose rupture of membranes, said Dr.
If an HIV-infected pregnant woman has a documented HIV RNA [greater than or equal to] 1,000 copies/mL at 34 weeks gestation or above, then she should be offered a scheduled caesarean delivery at 38 weeks gestation in order to decrease the risk of vertical HIV transmission before the spontaneous onset of labour and rupture of membranes (6,38).