sabbatical

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sabbatical

1. denoting a period of leave granted to university staff, teachers, etc., esp approximately every seventh year
2. denoting a post that renders the holder eligible for such leave
3. any sabbatical period

Sabbatical

of, relating to, or appropriate to the Sabbath as a day of rest and religious observance
References in periodicals archive ?
The sabbatical would also be offered during employees' 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 35th and 40th years with the firm.
Pat Jury recently agreed to take a four-month sabbatical to help him, and the Iowa Credit Union League he has led for 25 years, prepare for the future.
for Work/Life Initiatives, 15% of 450 large employers offered paid sabbaticals to their employees.
Sabbaticals are now growing in the work place, as corporations strive to reduce employee "burn out leading to poor performance.
No longer sacred, sabbaticals and other forms of faculty leave are under the microscope, causing changes in the way they're being granted and managed.
When an employee takes a sabbatical, it is critical that their employers consider the following issues: Holiday and benefits - Where the contract of employment continues during the sabbatical period, employees will continue to accrue their statutory entitlement to be paid annual leave.
Whether I can replicate this sabbatical in SBI, I don't know," said Bhattacharya.
I recommend sabbaticals strongly to the clergy with whom I work.
This number is very, conservative, as anecdotal evidence seems to indicate strongly that more senior (and thus more greatly compensated) professors are more likely to take sabbaticals than are junior, and often non-tenured, faculty members, though USNH could not provide details on these specifics.
In both situations there are fewer funds available to pay for sabbaticals.
Caret told The Boston Globe that sabbaticals are earned and "not a gift," and that while sensitive to the issue of pay, he is not apologetic.
The program supports three- to six-month sabbaticals to retain nonprofit leaders who often deal with crises as part of their job.