sacrificial metal

sacrificial metal

[‚sak·rə′fish·əl ′med·əl]
(physical chemistry)
A metal that can be used for a sacrificial anode.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sacrificial metal corrodes instead of the protected metal of the pipeline.
It may be decided to use a relatively thin sacrificial metal, like zinc nickel or zinc alloy plating, containing heat cured coating or even apply a thermally sprayed aluminium coating.
Zinc coatings are used to provide a sacrificial metal that prevents corrosion, thus protecting the base metal.
Steel is sometimes covered with the sacrificial metal.
The settling of aggregates of the dispersed phase, or precipitates of the dissolved species, caused by flowing a suspension or emulsion between two sacrificial metal electrodes excited by an AC current is termed electro-coagulation.
Formulators use three basic strategies to provide corrosion protection: barrier technology to prevent oxygen and water from getting to the surface; passivation of the metal surface using corrosion inhibiting additives; and galvanic protection using a sacrificial metal additive.
Because the scientists could control how much of these sacrificial metals were inserted, the process yielded gold wires with precisely determined gaps.