Sad Sack


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Sad Sack

who can’t do anything right. [Comics: “The Sad Sack” in Horn, 595–596]

Sad Sack

hapless and helpless soldier; resigned to his fate. [Comics: Horn, 595–596]

Sad Sack

whose travails reflect those of all soldiers. [Comics: Horn, 595–596]
References in periodicals archive ?
I can remember reading Sad Sack comics in Yank during the war, and then in civilian comic books later on.
Sad Sack, a drafted Army private, was a disheveled-looking chap, with a big nose and big ears.
If lucrative television deals and blue-chip sponsors are to remain locked into tennis the game's rulers will have to come up with more than Sad Sack as a leading man.
She lays waste to the legions of no-hoper, sad sack, and bottom-of-the-basket cabaret singers who have gone before her.
It can be no accident that Matthew Broderick - that master of the sad sack turned hero - recently played the lead role of Charlie off-Broadway.
He goes from being a sad sack to the most popular guy in the area, as most of the Street's single women suddenly take a fancy to him.
This highly-fancied homegrown outfit have already undertaken a tour of libraries - a perfect place for overpolite, slightly sad sack, chin-stroking pop.
An even thinner thread is Darin's uncredited appearance in the 1957 Jerry Lewis film ``The Sad Sack.
Runners-up included: Clint Eastwood's dark boxing drama ``Million Dollar Baby'' (picture); Paul Giamatti, the sad sack wine connoisseur in ``Sideways'' (actor); Julie Delpy, one of the star-crossed lovers in ``Before Sunset'' (actress); Martin Scorsese (director, ``The Aviator''); Cate Blanchett, for her work in ``The Aviator'' and ``Coffee and Cigarettes'' (supporting actress); Morgan Freeman, playing an aging former boxer in ``Million Dollar Baby'' (supporting actor); and ``Fahrenheit 9/11'' (documentary).
For those who never saw the play or either movie (Frank Oz directed the 1986 musical version), there's a sad sack florist named Seymour (Anthony Rapp) who, when not worshipping shop mate Audrey, is experimenting with interesting and unusual new plants.
As remarkable as Carrey is in these bravura sequences, it is his splendid low-key work as the yearning sad sack that is most impressive here.
The wife of sad sack Frederick Fellowes (Dian Hiatt) left poor Freddy the night before, and Belinda Blair (Maura Vincent) is the company's peacemaker.