saddle reef

saddle reef

[′sad·əl ‚rēf]
(geology)
A mineral deposit associated with the crest of an anticlinal fold and following the bedding plane, usually found in vertical succession. Also known as saddle vein.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is a large mineralised system with gold hosted in saddle reef and shear structures; high-grade shoots are known to plunge approximately 20-30A towards a bearing of 330A and nearsurface supergene enrichment is common.
Underground rock chip sampling within artisan underground mines has recently revealed high- grade mineralization within a separate, recently recognized saddle reef system.
The fold nose of this anticline is a probable site for thickening of mineralization and is currently the target for proving a Saddle Reef type deposit.
It is a large mineralised system with gold hosted in saddle reef and shear structures; high-grade shoots are known to plunge approximately 20-30 DEG towards a bearing of 330 DEG and near-surface supergene enrichment is common.
BBG examples have shown that saddle reef type gold deposits, similar to those at Goldboro, can also be mined profitably.
The large mineralised system has gold hosted in saddle reef and shear structures often with near surface supergene enrichment.
As a result of these new interpretations, ABM has determined that the correct way to drill these quartz saddle reefs is with either vertical holes along the anticline axis or with holes angled from south to north (and not east - west as per previous explorers).
The quartz veins exist as saddle reefs with the high grade anticline hinge zones plunging south at an inferred 50 to 60 degree angle.