safety factor


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safety factor

[′sāf·tē ‚fak·tər]
(electricity)
The amount of load, above the normal operating rating, that a device can handle without failure.
(mechanics)
(ordnance)
Increase in range or elevation that must be set on a gun so that friendly troops, over whose heads fire is to be delivered, will not be endangered.
Overload factor in design to ensure safe operation.

factor of safety, safety factor

1. The ratio of the ultimate stress of a structure or pressure vessel to the design working stress.
2. The ratio of the ultimate breaking strength of a member or piece of material or equipment to the actual working stress or safe load when in use.

safety factor

The ratio of the maximum load a structure is designed to withstand to the maximum load it will be subjected to during a normal operating regime.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 2 shows the safety factor values and delta moment resistance for a four-meter embankment.
Substituting the cohesion safety factor into (11), we can obtain the internal friction angle safety factor such that only one computation is required to obtain the safety factor of the slope.
The results for the safety factors demonstrated that respondents were concerned about UPM pedestrian environment safety.
Diversity assumptions, like safety factors, should be applied to the actual parameters that are diversely allocated rather than any value resultant to a subsequent calculation.
Considering uncertainties associated with ASET and RSET, the safety factor is treated as a random variable, rather than a traditional deterministic variable.
Safety Factor for Woa (Humidity Ratio of the Entering Outdoor Air)
sf] are safety factors, respectively applied to tension strength of the reinforcement and to the lateral friction; [F.
The buckling load factor is a safety factor, defined as:
Environmental Protection Agency standards for pesticides require a tenfold buffer to safeguard children if there are gaps in information, and can opt for a lower safety factor.
What are the sources of error in testing, and what safety factor is required to accommodate for these errors in setting final length requirements?