sail


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sail:

see sailingsailing,
as a sport, the art of navigating a sailboat for recreational or competitive purposes. Racing Classes

There is no single "yacht type" of boat, rather many types that include sloops, yawls, catamarans, and ketches.
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Sail

 

(of a vessel), a flexible panel or sheet of canvas or some other material, used to convert wind energy into propulsion energy. The wind exerts direct pressure when it blows at right angles to the sail or creates aerodynamic lift when the airflow moves along the sail. Sails are distinguished according to shape as square sails, which may be rectangular or in the form of an equilateral trapezoid, and fore-and-aft sails, which may be three-or four-cornered. Canvas sailcloth, synthetic fabrics, stiff matting, and other materials are used to make sails. Fully battened panels are used for the sails on junks. Each sail has its own name according to its position on the vessel. Sails are also used on iceboats.

sail

[sāl]
(naval architecture)
An article made of canvas and rope designed to be spread on spars in such a manner as to utilize the power of the wind in driving a vessel.

Sail

[sāl]
(astronomy)

sail

1. an area of fabric, usually Terylene or nylon (formerly canvas), with fittings for holding it in any suitable position to catch the wind, used for propelling certain kinds of vessels, esp over water
2. a voyage on such a vessel
3. a vessel with sails or such vessels collectively
4. a ship's sails collectively
5. the conning tower of a submarine
6. in sail having the sail set
7. make sail
a. to run up the sail or to run up more sail
b. to begin a voyage
8. set sail
a. to embark on a voyage by ship
b. to hoist sail
9. under sail
a. with sail hoisted
b. under way
www.sailing.org

SAIL

(body, education)

SAIL

(language)

SAIL

(language)
An early system on the Larc computer.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16, May 1959].
References in classic literature ?
The poor fellow may have been seated at one time, but the flapping and buffeting of the sails had worked through the rudder of the wheel and had dragged him to and fro, so that the cords with which he was tied had cut the flesh to the bone.
Finding that we were once more able to move according to our ideas, instead of being pitched and thrown about like peas in a bladder, we crept forward, and cut down the sail.
When he sails, he sits down, but he stands up to paddle.
So saying he commenced to scull the canoe's nose before the wind, while I made fast the primitive sheets that held our crude sail.
She was to go to Sydney on the first steamer, purchase the schooner, and sail back with an island skipper on board.
Come on, lad," he called to me; and we lost no time jumping into our salmon boat and getting up sail.
In a sand-boat, which has runners like a sled and sails like a ship.
She can scarce draw clear," cried Hawtayne, with his eyes from the sail to the seething line of foam.
32-54) When he had said this, he had mast and sail hoisted on the ship, and the wind filled the sail and the crew hauled taut the sheets on either side.
Johnson seems to spend all his spare time there or aloft at the crosstrees, watching the Ghost cleaving the water under press of sail.
When all these means of entertainment failed, a sail would heave in sight: looming, perhaps, the very spirit of a ship, in the misty distance, or passing us so close that through our glasses we could see the people on her decks, and easily make out her name, and whither she was bound.
The story goes that the King wanted a good sailor to sail across the sea.