sailcloth


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sailcloth

1. any of various fabrics from which sails are made
2. a lighter cloth used for clothing, etc.

Sailcloth

 

a heavy, closely woven linen or partly linen fabric, plainwoven from thick yarn. It was originally used for sails; hence the name. Sailcloth is used in unprocessed form or treated for commercial applications such as use in sails, tarpaulins, and the uppers of footwear. It is also used for work clothes and special-purpose clothes.

sailcloth

[′sāl‚klȯth]
(textiles)
A generic term for heavy, durable fabrics with a strong canvas weave made of cotton, linen, jute, polyester, or nylon; used for sails as well as for other applications.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most recently, carbon fibre has emerged as the latest fibre for sailcloth, just as it has also emerged as the base for composite structural parts for yachts.
Key words: laminates, sailcloth, strength, stretch resistance
It is estimated a new set of polyester sails cart be good for up to ten years of typical social sailing a couple of weekends a month, depending on the wind strength they are typically sailed in and factors such as UV exposure, which can drastically reduce the integrity of sailcloth.
Stratis is Doyle's own fibre-aligned laminate sailcloth technology, designed in-house by the Doyle team for shape retention and durability.
He also specified Hood Sails, featuring the latest high-tech Dimension Polyant D4 composite laminate sailcloth.
But despite the downturn, the top sailcloth brands haven't been standing still during the recession and have rolled out plenty of new products to make upgrading worthwhile.
Black taffetas, or outer skins were then laid onto either side of the membrane to form the sailcloth.
Like her predecessors, Alfa Romeo 3 in every respect is at the cutting edge of yacht design, engineering and construction, and in rig and sail design and in sailcloth.
A subsequent outcome was a successful move by Weatherly's disgruntled skipper 'Bus' Mosbacher through the New York Yacht Club that forced future challengers to use only sails made from sailcloth manufactured in their own country.
Fraser and Stephens knew that the components (films, adhesive and yarns) had to be held in close contact for best lamination and that pressures approaching those used in conventional sailcloth lamination could not be applied over a flexible mould.
The link provided Doyle with access to the D4 laminated sailcloth technology.