sailplane

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sailplane:

see gliderglider,
type of aircraft resembling an airplane but having at most a small auxiliary propulsion plant and usually no means of propulsion at all. The typical modern glider has very slender wings and a streamlined body.
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sailplane

sailplane
A high-performance glider meant for soaring. With their high aspect ratio wings and light weight, sailplanes can stay aloft for a considerable period.
References in periodicals archive ?
Finland: Man was killed in a mid-air collision of two ultra-light glider planes during the Finnish Sailplane Championships at the weekend, organisers said Monday.
The long, efficient wings of sailplanes allow for very low stall speeds and benign handling qualities, as well as being particularly sensitive to adverse yaw.
Actually, some high performance sailplanes produced by German engineers and Czech craftsmen cost more, even without motors, due to the dollar's weakness against the Euro.
Escalating through heavier sailplanes, this technique transitioned in 1942 at the Army Air Corps test and experimentation facilities near Dayton, Ohio, for postinvasion cargo glider recovery.
He swapped hang-gliding for sailplanes 10 years ago.
Bill Gagen walks around a sailplane before takeoff; sailplanes line up for launch; the view from a glider soaring over the U.
I have some experience flying radio-controlled sailplanes and working the lift manually as an RC pilot.
I have even studied machine drawing and drawn cross-sections of aircraft engines, as well as designed various model planes I subsequently built and flew, sailplanes most of all.
Mr Freeman, aged 47, sometimes flies powered sailplanes over the beach near his home and has launched unpowered hang-gliders from seaside cliffs but has not yet been forced to ditch in the sea at Newbiggin.
In rare spare time, he flies sailplanes competitively and windsurfs in the frigid waters of lake Michigan.
So Perseus will take off in the manner of some sailplanes, pulled forward with the help of a winch-driven cable until it's airborne, at which time the motor will engage and the cable will release the craft.