saltpeter


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saltpeter

or

saltpetre:

see potassium nitratepotassium nitrate,
chemical compound, KNO3, occurring as colorless, prismatic crystals or as a white powder; it is found pure in nature as the mineral saltpeter, or niter. (The name saltpeter is also applied to sodium nitrate, although less frequently.
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saltpeter

[sȯlt′pēd·ər]
(inorganic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
Beginning with Henry VIII's interest and investment in artillery and moving through Elizabeth I's escalating wars with Spain, but briefly interrupted by James I's peaceful early years, England's demand for saltpeter continued to rise.
Kinetics of ammonium saltpeter decomposition in an open system.
The collected plant samples were trimmed, then put in a beaker with a round bottom, along with a 50 ml saltpeter solution with a density of 10%, and boiled for 3 min to make the epidermis separate and float.
Navy Department," for purifying saltpeter, which should be deducted from the expenses debited to the "Factory" account.
The humidity has also caused saltpeter to accumulate on the interior walls.
Gunpowder, or black powder, is a mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter (potassium nitrate).
At this time, the indigenous and mestiza communities began to migrate to the intermediate desert depression close to the deposits of copper, silver and sodium nitrate (known as saltpeter or salitre), setting up the first mining camps on the periphery of the operations.
Like many caves in the area, it was used for saltpeter mining in the 18th and 19th centuries (Larry Johnson and Jim Hodson, pers.
Other industries like saltpeter, coal, and timber peaked and plateaued with the times, and after World War II most residents left in search of a better life.
The earliest production of saltpeter is believed to have been a product of the decomposition of a mixture of manure, straw and ashes, a process that took approximately a year.
Worsley then returned to Dublin, where he encountered his nemesis, William Petty, and for much of the 1650s dabbled in numerous fields including saltpeter and apothecary.
The cold, trimmed, fresh hams were dry cured with a curing mixture of eight pounds of salt, two pounds of brown sugar and four ounces of saltpeter for each 100 pounds of meat.