salvage

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salvage,

in maritime law, the compensation that the owner must pay for having his vessel or cargo saved from peril, such as shipwreck, fire, or capture by an enemy. Salvage is awarded only when the party making the rescue was under no legal obligation to do so. A claim for salvage ordinarily is allowed if the salvor's activities had some effect in averting the threatened peril even if they were not indispensable. In the United States, salvage is granted for rescues made on navigable streams and lakes as well as on the open sea. Salvage includes a reward designed to encourage rescue operations besides the payment for the value of the services. In setting the amount of the salvage, courts consider relevant factors such as the expense and hazard of the rescue and the price of the ship or goods saved. Salvage is distributed by the court to the owner, the master, and the crew of the rescuing ship, usually according to fixed ratios. Salvage money is not payable to the captain and crew of ships commissioned by a government specifically for rescue operations.

Salvage

The controlled removal of construction or demolition debris, or other waste, from a permitted building or demolition site for the purpose of recycling, reuse, or storage for later recycling or reuse. Commonly salvaged materials include structural beams and posts, flooring, doors, cabinetry, brick, and decorative items.

salvage

In a building under repair or reconstruction, the saving of damaged or discarded material, for use or resale, which otherwise would be a total loss.

salvage

1. the act, process, or business of rescuing vessels or their cargoes from loss at sea
2. compensation paid for the salvage of a vessel or its cargo
References in periodicals archive ?
Underwater salvaging of old-growth species no longer available or in very limited supply is an exciting proposition that has the world wood market in a tizzy and a host of would-be salvagers jumping on the bandwagon, or, in this case, the barge.
At the least, you should have more than one salvager look at the vehicle and offer a price.
Thanks to his Discovery Real Time show The Salvager I renamed Le Salvager since he moved to France last year I Rico now has an international cult following which spans streetwise London teens and Filipino fans, hooked on his gung-ho approach to DIY (which returns on Wednesday at 10pm).
The Ninth Circuit's analysis included the following: 1) whether the material in question will be reused or recycled by the industry from which it was generated; (233) 2) whether the material is actually reused or is only potentially reusable; (234) and 3) whether the materials are reused by the party that generated them, rather than another party acting as a salvager or reclaimer.
However, Winter's late salvager ensured Cowden's passport into Division Two at their opponents' expense.
When such a fact sits on the boundary line between morally desirable and morally undesirable behavior, this "chilling effect" is bad, for in that case the forgone conduct would have generated licit utility: society loses out if a nervous salvager refrains from picking up what is truly abandoned junk because he worries that it might be deemed someone else's property.
Besides recycling cardboard, glass, aluminum, tin and more, Graubard purchases reconditioned baskets, clay pots, and glass and plastic containers from a local floral goods salvager.
Prosecutors agreed to the light sentence when they learned Weber's car, seized after the deaths, was sold to a salvager two months after the September 2004 accident and destroyed.
Other books that deal with boys who beat the odds include Jeff Hirsh's new book, The Eleventh Plague in which teenage salvager Stephen Quinn is forced to consider the cost of life now that his grandfather is dead.
The giant hoards of ancient Chinese porcelain were finally raised from the seabed following a chance discovery by an amateur wreck salvager.
Beach is a salvager who hauls stuff out of industrial Dumpsters in the hopes of refurbishing items for resale, but the clutter always overwhelms his ambitions.
Just in time, though, 52 of the missing statuettes were found by Los Angeles junk salvager Willie Fulgear in a trash bin in Koreatown, a discovery that made him almost as famous as the celebs the Academy honors.