sand fly


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Related to sand fly: sandfly fever

sand fly:

see midgemidge,
name for any of numerous minute, fragile flies in several families. The family Chironomidae consists of about 2,000 species, most of which are widely distributed. The herbivorous larvae are found in all freshwaters; the larvae of some species live in saltwater.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Larvae were fed with a sand fly larval diet consisting of a composted mixture of rabbit feces and rabbit food.
This process involves deliberately exposing infants, especially girls, to the bite of a phlebotomine sand fly on a part of the body that is normally covered by clothing (40).
Only a few studies have addressed sand fly resistance to pesticides, so Li is looking at sand fly genes to find answers.
As sand flies are the incriminated vector of the virus, as suggested by repeated isolations (2), the high susceptibility of the sand fly cell line was expected.
Doctors suspect that the process leading to human infection begins when a sand fly bites a rodent called the burrowing wood rat, which carries the parasite.
In the region of northern Texas, doctors suspect that the process leading to human infection begins when a sand fly bites a rodent called the burrowing wood rat, which carries the parasite.
They are notorious vectors of agents of several deadly and disfiguring diseases such as Leishmaniasis, sand fly fever, and bartonellosis (Lane 1996).
It can take several months from the time you get a bite from an infected sand fly until you show signs of the disease.
Symptoms of the infection can take 4-6 months to appear after a bite from an infected sand fly, and some unknowingly infected military personnel return to their communities before the lesions develop.
Peter Farnworth, 67, from St Helens, died after contracting the deadly disease from a sand fly in Tenerife and mistakenly believed he had the flu.
While still in the sand fly, the parasite secretes--and then multiplies in--a gel that obstructs the fly's throat.