sandalwood


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sandalwood,

name for several fragrant tropical woods, especially for Santalum album, an evergreen partially parasitic tree either native to India or introduced there centuries ago. It is used for joss sticks in Buddhist religious ceremonies and funeral rites, as a paste or powder by Hindus and Jains, and is made into ornamental wares. The essential oil distilled from the wood is used extensively as a fragrance and has a place in traditional medicine. Santalum species are distributed Japan, Indonesia, and Australia across the Pacific to the Hawaiian and the Juan Fernández islands. Red sandalwood obtained from a leguminous tree (Adenanthera pavonina), also native to India, was probably the almug of the Bible. It is used chiefly as the source of a dye. Sandalwood is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnaliopsida, order Santalales, family Santalaceae.
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sandalwood

sandalwood

Small tropical tree. Thin opposite lance-shaped leaves, shiny on top, pale on bottom. Takes up to 5 years to get viable seeds from new tree. Most famous for it’s essential oil, used in passing of kidney stones, urinary tract infections, relaxant, aphrodisiac.

Sandalwood

 

(Santalum album), an evergreen tree of the family Santalaceae. The tree reaches a height of about 10 m. The sandalwood usually parasitizes the roots of sugarcane, bamboo, and palm, but it is also capable of developing independently. Sandalwood roots form suckers (haustoria) that penetrate the root tissues of other plants and suck out their nutrient substances. The sandalwood grows primarily in teak forests in India, on the Malay Peninsula, and on the islands of the Malay Archipelago. It is cultivated in India. The fragrant, yellow trunk wood contains 3–6 percent essential oil in its pith. The oil is used in perfume and medicine. The wood, souvenirs manufactured from the wood, and the essential oil are exported. Other species of Santalum having fragrant wood are also called sandalwood, for example, S. cunninghamii from New Zealand and S. austro-caledonicum from Australia and New Caledonia. Some species of the genera Derris and Bafia that have aromatic wood are also called sandalwood.

S. S. MORSHCHIKHINA

sandalwood

[′san·dəl‚wu̇d]
(botany)
Any species of the genus Santalum of the sandalwood family (Santalaceae) characterized by a fragrant wood.
S. album. A parasitic tree with hard, close-grained, aromatic heartwood used in ornamental carving and cabinetwork.

sandalwood

, sandal
1. any of several evergreen hemiparasitic trees of the genus Santalum, esp S. album (white sandalwood), of S Asia and Australia, having hard light-coloured heartwood: family Santalaceae
2. the wood of any of these trees, which is used for carving, is burned as incense, and yields an aromatic oil used in perfumery
3. any of various similar trees or their wood, esp Pterocarpus santalinus (red sandalwood), a leguminous tree of SE Asia having dark red wood used as a dye
References in periodicals archive ?
Below these bags, the officers uncovered a large quantity of red-coloured wooden logs which appeared to be red sandalwood.
East Indian sandalwood oil (EISO) is currently being studied by the company in several Phase 2 clinical trials in Australia and the US for treatment of various skin conditions such as psoriasis, warts, atopic dermatitis and molluscum contagiosum.
Opening with an unexpected spice of wasabi, the further notes of mandarin, vetiver, sandalwood and violet leaf mean you can now wearthe same scent as your other half
If you're a fan of powdery, floral musks like that of Tom Ford's perfumes then you'll love Orris and Sandalwood.
The CITES agreement bans importing the red sandalwood.
During the meeting, both the leaders are understood to have discussed several issues, including the seat- sharing formula, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to Bihar on Saturday and, above all, the snake- and- sandalwood controversy that had hit their alliance hard earlier this week.
Benzac is also the only skin care line to use East Indian Sandalwood Oil, which has been used for thousands of years in Eastern medicine and is known to have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties and soothes the skin.
Benzac cartons are 100% recyclable, and the sandalwood oil is sustainably sourced.
Calming incense, patchouli, sandalwood and oakmoss create serenity in the base.
Second only to the export of indigo from India was the trade in what has been variously called dyewood, red sandalwood, or red sanders (Pterocarpus santalinus).
Rajasingham, Editor of 'Asian Tribune' yesterday, presented Sandalwood young trees to Thirukethieswaram Temple, located in Mannar .
Tiare flower and violet leaf are balanced by coriander for a heart that evokes the spirit of island life, while a warm background of sensual amber, Tonka bean and Australian sandalwood linger.