sandhog


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sandhog

[′san‚häg]
(engineering)
A worker in compressed-air environments, as in driving tunnels by means of pneumatic caissons.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sandhog HD backreamer is available in 2 3/4-inch shaft size with 2.
But the decisive factor was that an accepted workplace practice finally proved so destructive to sandhog interests that an alternative practice was able, by design, to take root.
Drinking with fellow sandhogs became a way first of establishing and then of renewing one's bona fides with them.
The author of ``Payback'' seems to identify with Billy, perhaps because Kelly spent 10 years as a construction worker, including three as a sandhog in the Bronx, and went on to earn a bachelor's degree in political economy from Fordham University and a master's in public administration from Harvard.
The other sandhogs started drilling, taking up where the swing shift had left off.
An ex-Marine sergeant and sandhog who'd worked on the Lincoln Tunnel, veteran leading man of a dozen films, Robert was quiet and unaffected, with none of the self-important mannerisms of some movie stars.
All we lack is a mere $30-$55 billion, a dose of political spine and some truly bad-ass engineers and sandhogs.
Keane is at her best when she is making a foreign world visible, whether it is the Irish coast or the subterranean world of the sandhogs, underground miners (Michael Ward is one) creating New York's water tunnels.
But unlike blasting rock to build foundations for tall skyscrapers, this time sandhogs will work with rock that's 140 feet beneath the corner of Second Avenue and 63rd Street in Manhattan.
25 July 1953; definition of sandhogs from http://www.
However, Sonnenstuhl's work is unique in that he documented the introduction of a "sobriety culture" among the Sandhogs through the emergence and on-the-job presence of coworkers who were recovering from alcoholism.
Executive vice president of NYC's Economic Development Corporation, Kate Ascher, describes the technologies that keep the city functioning, as well as the people who support them--the pilots that bring the ships in over the Narrows sandbar, the sandhogs who are currently digging the third water tunnel under Manhattan, the television engineer who scales the Empire State Building's antenna for routine maintenance, and the electrical wizards who maintain the century-old system that delivers power to subways.