sanguine

(redirected from sanguinely)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

sanguine

a red pencil containing ferric oxide, used in drawing

Sanguine

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Sanguine is the traditional name for the personality temperament indicated by an excess of the element air.

Sanguine

 

a type of reddish brown crayon. Both natural and artificial sanguines consist of kaolin and iron oxides. The sanguine technique has been known since the Renaissance, when it was used by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and other prominent artists. The medium was especially popular in 18th-century drawings from nature. Drawings in sanguine are shaded by hatching or stumping.

References in periodicals archive ?
Again, we see the movement between the abstract and the personal, the shift between a language that recognizes pain as a disembodied phenomenon about which one might converse or write, and what asserts itself as the antithesis of that abstraction, a pain felt in one's own body, a pain that damages the ability sanguinely to communicate its reality.
Eduard Verhagen and Pieter Sauer, sanguinely defend the apparently widespread Dutch practice of killing infants deemed "life unworthy of life.
We were discussing it as it was happening - our engineer was turning different shades of beet,'' Garofalo recalls sanguinely.
Like their neighbours to the south, Canadians cannot sit back sanguinely when it comes to the possibility of North Korean missiles.
If Rousseau was not deterred by this thought, it is because he sanguinely believed that people can be induced to take any shape that society seeks to impose on them, if only they are molded by the right institutions.
Speaking sanguinely it appears impossible the Spaniards can have an Idea that such an expedition would take place by the Cape of Good Hope and the Ships appearing so unexpected on the Coast and the enemy so unprepar'd that it must insure Success.
Nevertheless, it should not be too sanguinely claimed that the Chinese totally welcomed Judaism more than Christianity, for there is another aspect of Chinese culture that must be taken into account: Minority enclaves were much more easily accepted than proselytizing foreign religions.
Without that discretion, "justice would wear a countenance too sanguinely and cruel.
Though development agencies still enthusiastically support a "transition" in Central Asia, many sober observers are questioning whether it is right to refer sanguinely to a "transition" when there is little idea where it might lead.