sap


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

sap,

fluid in plants consisting of water and dissolved substances. Cell sap refers to this fluid present in the large vacuole, or cell cavity, that occupies most of the central portion of mature plant cells. The term sap is generally applied to all the fluid that travels through the vascular tissues (xylem and phloem) of higher plants. Water containing dissolved minerals enters the plant through the root hairs by osmosis and is transported upward through the xylem to the parts containing chlorophyll, usually the leaves. There, large amounts of water leave the plant by transpiration, although some is used in photosynthesis to produce food materials. The phloem carries the resulting highly concentrated colloidal solution down to the other plant parts for storage. Sap ascends at a rate of from 1 to 4 ft (30–122 cm) per hr; in the coast redwood it rises easily to a height of almost 400 ft (120 m). The exact mechanisms behind this enormous lifting force are not certain, although several principles are thought to be involved. Chief among them is the pull of transpiration; as water evaporates from the leaf cells, they draw in liquid osmotically from the xylem tubes to replace it. Because of the great cohesiveness of water molecules, the resulting tension affects the entire continuous column of water down to the root tips, which in turn absorb more water from the soil. Root pressure is another factor, although it can force the sap up only a limited distance and operates chiefly in the nongrowing season, which explains the sap flow when a leafless tree is tapped in winter. Atmospheric pressure and capillary attraction are minor factors. The sap of some plants (e.g., sugarcane, sugar maple) contains much sugar and is an article of commerce. The name sap is sometimes applied to latex (e.g., rubber), resin, and other specialized plant fluids.

What does it mean when you dream about sap?

The vital juices of plants and animals, sap represents bodily health and vigor (the sap of youth), which is why someone who feels depleted is “all sapped out.” Like the sap from the maple tree, someone who is excessively gullible or sentimental is “sappy” (sweet, syrupy).

sap

[sap]
(botany)
The fluid part of a plant which circulates through the vascular system and is composed of water, gases, salts, and organic products of metabolism.

sap

1. The fluid which circulates in trees, plants, etc.
2. Same as sapwood.
3.See quarry sap.
4. To dig a trench under a medieval fortress; used by besiegers who were intent on blowing up an enemy’s defensive structure.

sap

a solution of mineral salts, sugars, etc., that circulates in a plant

SAP

(company)
SAP AG (Systems, Applications and Products in Data Processing).

SAP

(protocol)

SAP

(networking)

SAP

(language)

SAP

(1) (SAP America, Inc., Newtown Square, PA, www.sap.com) The U.S. branch of one of the world's largest software companies, SAP AG, Walldorf, Germany. SAP was founded in 1972 as Systems, Applications and Products in Data Processing by five former engineers from IBM. SAP's R/2 mainframe and R/3 client/server business application suites were the flagship products for the company, catapulting the company into prominence in the 1980s and 1990s. Today, under the banner of the SAP Business Suite, SAP is a leading vendor in enterprise resource planning (ERP) and other enterprise business software.

In 2010, SAP acquired Sybase, maker of the popular Sybase database and related software. See SAP Business Suite, R/3 and Sybase.

(2) (Session Announcement Protocol) An IETF protocol for distributing session description messages to potential recipients. It is widely used to send SDP messages. See SIP.

(3) (Service Advertising Protocol) A NetWare protocol used to identify the services and addresses of servers attached to the network. The responses are used to update a table in the router known as the Server Information Table.

( 4) (Secondary Audio Program) An NTSC audio channel used for auxiliary transmission, such as foreign language broadcasting or teletext.
References in classic literature ?
And Violet said, Yes; so day after day they labored to make a pathway through the frozen earth, that she might reach the roots of the withered flowers; and soon, wherever through the dark galleries she went, the soft light fell upon the roots of flowers, and they with new life spread forth in the warm ground, and forced fresh sap to the blossoms above.
He could no more stir in her the emotions that make the sweet intoxication of young love than the mere picture of a sun can stir the spring sap in the subtle fibres of the plant.
I can hardly tell you what then; the conclusion to be drawn as to your character depends upon the nature of the motives which guide your conduct; if you are patient because you expect to make something eventually out of Crimsworth, notwithstanding his tyranny, or perhaps by means of it, you are what the world calls an interested and mercenary, but may be a very wise fellow; if you are patient because you think it a duty to meet insult with submission, you are an essential sap, and in no shape the man for my money; if you are patient because your nature is phlegmatic, flat, inexcitable, and that you cannot get up to the pitch of resistance, why, God made you to be crushed; and lie down by all means, and lie flat, and let Juggernaut ride well over you.
The sight of that sap, as it exudes with the heat, is painful to me, Richard, Really, it behooves the owner of woods so extensive as mine, to be cautious what example he sets his people, who are already felling the forests as if no end could be found to their treasures, nor any limits to their extent.
Only, since our last journey thither, the walls had taken a grayer tint, and the brickwork assumed a more harmonious copper tone; the trees had grown, and many that then only stretched their slender branches along the tops of the hedges, now bushy, strong, and luxuriant, cast around, beneath boughs swollen with sap, great shadows of blossoms of fruit for the benefit of the traveler.
The branch that was yellow-leaved the day before dripped sap when Mowgli broke it.
All the while she wondered if any strange good thing might come of her being in her ancestral land; and some spirit within her rose automatically as the sap in the twigs.
He was too young, too strong, too full of the sap of living, to submit so easily to the destruction of his hopes.
I had fought almost continuously for many hours; I had passed through such experiences and adventures as must sap the vitality of man, and with all this I had not eaten for nearly twenty-four hours, nor slept.
How cheap even the liberty then seems; how mean to study, when an emotion communicates to the intellect the power to sap and upheave nature; how great the perspective
It is a graft which shoots up, a sap which circulates, a vegetation which starts forth anew.
Ojo wondered how long one could live in such a condition and if the leaf would gradually sap his strength and even his life, in order to feed itself.