Satrapy


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Related to Satrapy: Persepolis, Satraps

Satrapy

 

a military-administrative division (province) in the kingdom of the Achaemenids, governed by a satrap. Circa 518 B.C., Darius I divided the kingdom into 20 satrapies, whose boundaries in most cases corresponded to the boundaries of the individual countries that were part of the Achaemenid state, such as Babylonia, Egypt, and Media. The number of satrapies and their boundaries changed often. Each satrapy paid an established tribute and could have its own laws, traditions, and language or languages. The division into satrapies was preserved in the Seleucid, Parthian, and Sassanid states.

References in periodicals archive ?
Washington's involvements in Iraq stood as yet another example of a strong entity that crushed a weak satrapy.
After the partition of Armenia between Byzantium and Persia in 387, Artsakh became part of the Kingdom of Albania, but in 469 Albania itself became a Persian satrapy under the name of Aran.
soon after the start of the Babylonian year, Seleucus reconquered his Babylonian satrapy and restored the name of Alexander IV in the date formulas of the cuneiform tablets.
Achaemenid texts affirm Persian suzerainty over the Makai and Maka appears to have been a satrapy, and this is taken to mean the territory of Oman; cf.
I do not see Baghdad ever becoming a satrapy of Tehran.
The Gandharan Grave culture is the name given by Dani (1992: 395) to the protohistoric cemeteries that were first noted in an area approximately corresponding to ancient Gandhara--the easternmost satrapy or province of the Achaemenid Empire.
Rather, the outgoing premier preferred to remain beholden to Iran, whose predilections to transform Iraq into a satrapy were fully documented.
This conjecture is supported by the fact that, toward the end of the Achaemenian reign, the satrapy of Hyrcania and Parthia was in the hands of one man named Phrataphernes, who was reinstated by the victorious Alexander the Great.
Entries for some toponyms are also surprisingly absent, notably Abarnahara, the Persian satrapy in which Phoenicia was included, and Lefkandi (the site is mentioned in the article on Euboians, but a specific treatment of the site and its relations with Phoenicia is necessary).
This is made explicit in Ezra 6:8, Darius' response to Tattenai: "Expenses are to be paid out of the funds of the satrapy of Beyond the River.
92), the Babylonian satrapy paid the Persian king a thousand talents of silver a year.
She interprets the Elephantine material to mean that Ezra's mission was limited to the appointment of royal judges for the satrapy, that dt "is natural law, the divinely protected but socially derived concepts of fairness and justice," comparable to Persian arta, Egyptian hp, and Akkadian kinatu, and that all the law codes--the Torah included--were scientific treatises by and for the scholar and not guides for the judge.