saturation deficit

saturation deficit

[‚sach·ə′rā·shən ′def·ə·sət]
(meteorology)
The difference between the actual vapor pressure and the saturation vapor pressure at the existing temperature.
The additional amount of water vapor needed to produce saturation at the current temperature and pressure, expressed in grams per cubic meter. Also known as vapor-pressure deficit.
References in periodicals archive ?
The saturation deficit was calculated from relative humidity and temperature data.
Data for saturation deficit and UV index were obtained from an average of 12 days before the counting day.
Additionally, correlation analyses between animal tick load data and climatic variables were performed, including those with the UV index and saturation deficit calculated before tick counts.
The UV index appears to be an opposite variable to the saturation deficit, since increased saturation deficit was associated with increased counts ([R.
Monsanto 919 performed better in both levels with maximum plant height, leaf area per plant, water potential, osmotic potential, turgor potential and minimum relative saturation deficit, while maize hybrid FH 810 remained sensitive at deficit irrigation (75% field capacity).
Turgor pressure was calculated as difference between water potential (psw) and osmotic potential (pss): psp = psw - pss Similarly, 24 DAS relative saturation deficit of 4 leaf from top was collected from each pot at morning time.
These leaves were taken out next day, water was removed with the help of tissue paper from the leaf surface and then weight was recorded again to obtain the saturated weight and relative saturation deficit was calculated as fallows (Ashraf et al.
There was no relationship of water potential with relative saturation deficit at 100% FC, however this association was strong enough at 75% FC (r2 = 0.
In this way, the higher fresh weight reached by 'Pao de Acucar' may be explained by the fact that this cultivar is of the head type, in which inner leaves are protected against environmental factors controlling the plant water flux, such solar radiation and air saturation deficit.
Three leaflets each from 3rd to 5th (top to bottom) leaves of plants were collected from 10 different plants of a genotype from each treatment and used immediately for determination of water saturation deficit (WSD) and EWL.
The moisture status of leaves was determined by the method outlined by Barrs and Weatherley (1962) expressed as water saturation deficit (WSD), which was calculated as follows:
Effect of soil moisture deficit stress on water saturation deficit (WSD) and epicuticular wax load (EWL) in some peanut genotypes in Exp.