savage

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savage

1. (of peoples) nonliterate or primitive
2. (of terrain) rugged and uncultivated
3. a member of a nonliterate society, esp one regarded as primitive

Savage

Michael Joseph. 1872-1940, New Zealand statesman; prime minister of New Zealand (1935-40)
References in classic literature ?
From the bull's side, just forward of the flank, protruded a feathered arrow-end, which accounted for his savageness.
Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world.
He expressed his condolences to the Egyptians over the victims of the bloody Arish mosque attack that targeted innocent worshipers, saying Arish attack is an evidence on the level of savageness these terrorist groups have reached.
Moore observes that Conrad hates imperialism as it causes savageness, selfishness and devastation.
Yet, although the two narratives appear to be dissimilar, there are striking parallels between them: the savageness of their respective eras and the horrific existence of the southern Italian within the peninsula.
Minutes from the meeting where the motion was passed reads: "Following the latest attacks by the Israeli State on the territory of the Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip, this council calls for a trade embargo with Israel and condemns the over-reaction and savageness used.
A statement from the head of the Lawyers Syndicate Sameh Ashour stated that reports are to be filed to the prosecutor general to take the necessary legal action against "the brutality and savageness that our colleagues were subjected to".
The savageness of our society is coming out into the open.
This process has been researched in detail by scholars who in general admit that, for instance, the success of modernization in England turned out to be ensured by determination of authorities, savageness of laws and might of state mechanisms that guaranteed rigorous implementation of laws.
The family wishes to keep the house as it is after the arson, to be a land-mark and witness to the Israeli crimes, racism and savageness.
According to the manuscript, Gracianus Romanus reigned by hereditary right, but 'on account of his savageness the common people slew him'.
On Tacitus's comparison of Messalina to a prostitute and his representation of the savageness of her desire, see Joshel 1995, 59-65.