savage

(redirected from savages)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.

savage

1. (of peoples) nonliterate or primitive
2. (of terrain) rugged and uncultivated
3. a member of a nonliterate society, esp one regarded as primitive

Savage

Michael Joseph. 1872-1940, New Zealand statesman; prime minister of New Zealand (1935-40)
References in classic literature ?
The savages now learned the superiority of the Long Knife, as they call the Virginians, by experience; being out-generalled in almost every battle.
It was a sour and savage Korak who bade farewell to his baboon allies upon the following morning.
As for the savages, they returned to the shore about eleven o'clock in the morning, as soon as the coral tops began to disappear under the rising tide; but I saw their numbers had increased considerably on the shore.
Leaving her infant with Loretto she rushed forward and threw herself upon her brother's neck, who clasped his long-lost sister to his heart with a warmth of affection but little compatible with the reputed stoicism of the savage.
They have discovered heathens and barbarians whom by horrible cruelties they have exasperated into savages.
Otherwise," added another of the officers, "how could he have lived a sufficient length of time among the savage denizens of the jungle, brute and human, to have become proficient in woodcraft, or in the use of African weapons.
They were talking loudly and gesticulating, and after a moment one of them leaped into the air, brandishing his spear and uttering savage war cries, which soon had their effect upon his fellows so that it was not long ere all of them were taking part in the wild show of savagery, which would bolster their waning courage and presently spur them on to another attack.
The barest fraction of a second before his spring another beast of prey above him leaped, its weird and savage cry mingling with his.
For a moment Bulan stood watching the retreating savages, a smile upon his lips, and then as the sudden equatorial dawn burst forth he turned to face the girl.
Toward the north they marched, back toward their savage settlement in the wild and unknown country which lies back from the Kongo in the uttermost depths of The Great Forest, and on either side of them traveled an invisible and relentless foe.
All savages appear to possess, to an uncommon degree, this power of mimicry.
It is a mistake to suppose that, in a country where the usual evidences of civilization exist, the condition of a very large body of the inhabitants may not be as degraded as that of savages.