scarf joint


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scarf joint

[′skärf ‚jōint]
(design engineering)
A joint made by the cutting of overlapping mating parts so that the joint is not enlarged and the patterns are complementary, and securing them by glue, fasteners, welding, or other joining method.

scarf joint

A wood joint formed by two members cut diagonally to overlap and interlock; pegs, glue, straps, or other devices are used to attach the members. See also: Joint

scarf joint

scarf joint, 1
1. A joint by which the ends of two pieces of timber are united to form a continuous piece; the mating surfaces may be beveled, chamfered, notched, etc., before bolting, gluing, welding, etc.
2. A joint formed by bonding the beveled ends of two pieces of lumber.
3. In welding, a butt joint between two pieces whose ends are beveled.
4. A joint in electrical cable in which the ends are beveled before soldering.
References in periodicals archive ?
This applies to insides and outsides of bows and sterns, to seam where side and bottom panels join, down inner and outer seam between bottom and sides, to seams of proper scarf joints, to both sides of a butt-board scarf and all around the central frame.
A finger-joint cuts away many times less wood than a scarf joint (Madsen and Littleford 1962).
If your room doesn't have any outside corners or require scarf joints, you'll finish the job with a piece that's coped on both ends.
The long scarf joints in laminated beams are a thing of the past, replaced by fingerjoints, which save material without loss of strength.
These could be in the form of glued splice or scarf joints.