scarf

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Related to scarfs: scarves, H&M

scarf

Whaling an incision made along a whale's body before stripping off the blubber

scarf

1. The end on one of the pieces of timber forming a scarf joint.
References in classic literature ?
If you see no scarf you may consider that everything between us is ended forever.
At the thought of all this splendour, Hetty got up from her chair, and in doing so caught the little red-framed glass with the edge of her scarf, so that it fell with a bang on the floor; but she was too eagerly occupied with her vision to care about picking it up; and after a momentary start, began to pace with a pigeon-like stateliness backwards and forwards along her room, in her coloured stays and coloured skirt, and the old black lace scarf round her shoulders, and the great glass ear-rings in her ears.
Poyser disapproved; but she would have been ready to die with shame, vexation, and fright if her aunt had this moment opened the door, and seen her with her bits of candle lighted, and strutting about decked in her scarf and ear-rings.
It was fully forty seconds before he even realized that the two Hungarian servants had done it, and that they had done it with his own military scarf.
He was half-way towards the gardens of the palace before he even tried to tear the strangling scarf from his neck and jaws.
Only, there was also a high wind, which blew Christine's scarf out to sea.
It's all right, I'll go and fetch your scarf out of the sea.
Highcamp undraped the scarf from about him with her own hands.
He longed to stoop his cheek and rub it against her scarf.
I saw this, within the first minute of my contemplation of the patient; for, in her restless strivings she had turned over on her face on the edge of the bed, had drawn the end of the scarf into her mouth, and was in danger of suffocation.
There were the rolling meadows, the stately elms, all yellow and brown now; the glowing maples, the garden-beds bright with asters, and the hollyhocks, rising tall against the parlor windows; only in place of the cheerful pinks and reds of the nodding stalks, with their gay rosettes of bloom, was a crape scarf holding the blinds together, and another on the sitting-room side, and another on the brass knocker of the brown-painted door.
After taking a plain white muslin scarf, a pair of light gray kid gloves, and a garden-hat of Tuscan straw, from the drawers of the wardrobe, she locked it, and put the key carefully in her pocket.