scattering layer


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scattering layer

[′skad·ə·riŋ ‚lā·ər]
(oceanography)
A layer of organisms in the sea which causes sound to scatter and to return echoes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Braun suspects that the animals spend the energy necessary to dive to the deep scattering layer because they have a guaranteed source of food there.
Previous studies suggested that application of scattering layer - which usually has a one-dimensional structure such as nanobars and nanotubes - results in scattering and increasing the length of the path through which light comes in.
The researchers have successfully conserved the main advantage of titanium oxide nanobar in the light scattering layer, and they have overcome the problem of decreasing the surface area.
Instead of attempting to increase efficiency by altering the thickness of the solar cell's polymer layer - a tactic that has preciously garnered mixed results - the researchers sought to design the geometric pattern of the scattering layer to maximize the amount of time light remained trapped within the cell.
The vast life of the deep scattering layer supports the surface life above it, including the $172 billion global seafood and aquaculture industries.
They were racing offshore to begin diving into the deep scattering layer.
KEY WORDS: pelagic shrimps, deep scattering layer, geographical distribution, vertical migration, swarming behavior
Timings of crater disappearances and reappearances may give some indication of scattering, but they are primarily governed by refraction well above the scattering layer.
Therefore, the maximum number of scattering layers is 2 in our experiments.
Data on vertical distribution of temperature, salinity, water density, current speed, dissolved oxygen concentration, phytoplankton biomass, and sound scattering layers (mainly formed by fish schools) could be complemented by a traditional sampling on board a research vessel coming from time to time to visit the glider.