scent gland


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

scent gland

[′sent ‚gland]
(vertebrate zoology)
A specialized skin gland of the tubuloalveolar or acinous variety which produces substances having peculiar odors; found in many mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Head, antennal segments I and II, rostral segments, pronotum, lateral plates, scent gland plates of abdominal segments III-IV, IV-V, V-VI, VI-VII, femora, tibiae, and tarsi pale brown; antennal segments III, IV; abdomen, and mesial line of pro-, meso-, and metanotum whitish-yellow; eyes red-brown.
One prosomal sac-like scent gland is situated directly beneath the integument on each side of the carapace.
In these 13 observations, the harvestmen did not release visible secretions from their scent glands and either remained motionless (n = 10) or kept walking slowly when contacted by the spiders (n = 3).
The name refers to posterior scent glands that emit a foul odor when the insect is squashed or pressured.
Hamsters never get lost: Chinese hamsters have scent glands on their abdomens that they rub on objects to leave a scent trail so they can follow it back to their den.
For these identifications, scientists collected the cast skins, which retain chemicals from the bed bug's scent glands, at specific stages.
They have scent glands on their wrists and chests that they use to mark their territories.
Dogs have scent glands near their anus, which contain a foul-smelling secretion.
They would brush the nose across the face, because there are scent glands on our faces, and over time the brush of the face became a brush of the lips, and the social greeting was born that way.
Chemicals in the buck's urine and scent glands stimulate the doe's reproductive system, causing, among other things, ovaries to develop.
Cats need to mark their territory and do so both by rubbing the scent glands on their cheeks against items or, less acceptably, by scratching them.