Scholarliness

(redirected from scholarly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Scholarliness

Angelic Doctor
soubriquet of St. Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225-1274), scholastic philosopher. [Ital. Hist.: Benét, 44]
Bardo
blind antiquarian wrapped up in his scholarly annotations of the classics. [Br. Lit.: George Eliot Romola]
Sixte, Adrien
secluded philosopher, totally preoccupied with theoretical considerations. [Fr. Lit.: Paul Bourget The Disciple in Magill I, 209]
Thaumaste
English scholar who debated with Panurge by gesture alone. [Fr. Lit.: Gargantua and Pantagruel]
References in periodicals archive ?
To provide support for health sciences librarians who are becoming active in this new role, MLA introduced the Ad Hoc Committee for Advocating Scholarly Communications in 2008 to discuss scholarly communications initiatives; it became the standing Scholarly Communications Committee in 2012.
Altmetrics'reliance on the social web to evaluate scholarly publications allows researchers to receive much faster feedback on the impact of their academic work.
Because scholarly communications is such a dynamic environment, we like to maintain a freshness and vitality to the Toolkit, noted ReSEC chair Amy Buckland, institutional repository manager at the University of Chicago.
The Scholarly Commons Madrid workshop included 50 invited attendees, composed to include stakeholders from across the ecosystem of scholarly production and consumption.
Implementing a scholarly impact outreach program holds many advantages for faculty, graduate students, and in turn, the library.
Along with time and knowledge in the lacking category, there is the factor of less mentoring, guidance, and support available to facilitate scholarly publication among nurses who have fulfilled their degree requirements.
Davis-Kahl, a scholarly communications librarian at Illinois Wesleyan U.
In this paper, I ask why so few open access, feminist scholarly journals have emerged in Canada.
Moreover, by replacing originality with independent scholarly contribution as a condition of (undergraduate) publication (and institutional support more broadly), I am not suggesting a merely terminological change.
Borgman (2000) describes scholarly communication as "the study of how scholars in any field (e.
Sociology of Law: Visions of a Scholarly Tradition is another important contribution to the sociology of law, offering an approachable, well-structured introduction to the field for the student, and a scholarly, detailed survey for the specialist.
As an integral component of a comprehensive reference database, scholarly books can add enormous value.