schooner


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schooner

(sko͞o`nər), sailing vessel, rigged fore-and-aft, with from two to seven masts. Schooners can lie closer to the wind than square-rigged sailing ships, need a smaller crew, and are very fast. They were first constructed in colonial America and because of their speed became one of the favorite craft of the United States and Canada in the latter half of the 18th cent. and the first half of the 19th cent. Schooners were widely used in the North Atlantic fisheries and the North American coastal trade until World War I, when they were replaced by power-driven craft.

Bibliography

See H. I. Chapelle, The History of American Sailing Ships (1935); J. F. Leavitt, Wake of the Coasters (1970); N. Haley, The Schooner Era (1972).

Schooner

 

a fore-and-aft rigged vessel with at least two masts. With displacements of 100 to 5,000 tons, schooners are used as cargo, fishing, sport, and training vessels. Most modern schooners are equipped with internal-combustion engines, which enable them to travel during calm weather and in narrow fairways. The barkentine and the brigantine are special types of schooners.

schooner

[′skün·ər]
(naval architecture)
A sailing vessel with two or more masts rigged fore and aft.

schooner

a sailing vessel with at least two masts, with all lower sails rigged fore-and-aft, and with the main mast stepped aft
References in classic literature ?
It was now nearly the hour of high tide, but the waves were so great that in their troughs the shallows of the shore were almost visible, and the schooner, with all sails set, was rushing with such speed that, in the words of one old salt, "she must fetch up somewhere, if it was only in hell".
At anchor a schooner looks better; she has an aspect of greater efficiency and a better balance to the eye, with her two masts distributed over the hull with a swaggering rake aft.
The schooner, with a triangular riding-sail on the mainmast, played easily at anchor, and except for the man by the cabin-roof - "house" they call it - she was deserted.
We shipped them aboard the Duque de Mondejo's yacht Braganza; the schooner Spindrift had disappeared from the face of the waters for ever.
Such time as he could find from the many duties which had devolved upon him in the matter of obtaining and outfitting the schooner, and signing her two mates and crew of fifteen, had been spent with his employer's daughter.
Maybe Jessie, maybe other fella schooner," came the faltering admission.
Also he could collect the stories and the poems into books, and make sure of the valley and the bay and the schooner.
White marster along schooner plenty friend along me too much.
And near her, just come in from the sea on the wings of the squall, he saw another schooner hove to and dropping a boat into the water.
When the story went around the water-front of how French Frank had tried to run me down with his schooner, and of how I had stood on the deck of the Razzle Dazzle, a cocked double-barrelled shotgun in my hands, steering with my feet and holding her to her course, and compelled him to put up his wheel and keep away, the water-front decided that there was something in me despite my youth.
And I sent a schooner clear to Hawaii to bring back a dismantled sugar mill and a German who said he knew the field-end of cane.
I had glanced occasionally at the approaching schooner, and it was now almost abreast of us and not more than a couple of hundred yards away.