scout

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scout

1. (esp at Oxford University) a college servant
2. Obsolete (in Britain) a patrolman of a motoring organization

scout

[skau̇t]
(engineering)
An engineer who makes a preliminary examination of promising oil and mining claims and prospects.
(navigation)
To search an area by following an orderly pattern of courses.
A craft engaged in search.

Scout

[skau̇t]
(aerospace engineering)
A four-stage all-solid-propellant rocket, used as a space probe and orbital test vehicle; first launched July 1, 1960, with a 150-pound (68-kilogram) payload.

scout

scoutclick for a larger image
To probe an airspace or a surface area for the presence of something. To search for hostile aircraft, submarines, or targets. A scout helicopter can guide the strike aircraft and/or attack helicopter onto the target. A slower fixed-wing aircraft can also act as a scout.

Scout

Tonto’s horse. [TV: “The Lone Ranger” in Terrace, II, 34; Radio: “The Lone Ranger” in Buxton, 143]
See: Horse
References in periodicals archive ?
To be selected as a future home, a nest site must attract a certain number of scout bees.
These key parameters are the number of scout bees n, the number of selected sites m, the number of elite sites e chosen from m sites, the number of bees recruited to search e elite sites nep, the number of bees recruited to search m-e other sites nsp and termination criteria.
They find somewhere to swarm while scout bees look for a suitable hive in something like a hole in a tree.
Worker bees and their queen usually cluster on a tree branch until scout bees find a new nest site.
Over the next few days, several hundred scout bees search out 10 to 20 potential sites in hollow trees.
They were basically waiting for the scout bees to come back and say they had found somewhere to live such as a chimney or a tree.
When the time comes to find a new home, scout bees go out to look for one, then the whole cluster reaches a consensus about where to go,' he said.
Scout bees found the abandoned nest, and, within 2 hours, 150 bees were pulling out wasp eggs, larvae, and pupae.