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scribe

(skrīb), Jewish scholar and teacher (called in Hebrew, Soferim) of law as based upon the Old Testament and accumulated traditions. The work of the scribes laid the basis for the Oral Law, as distinct from the Written Law of the Torah. The period of their activity is in doubt. They may have been active from the time of Ezra (c.444 B.C.) to that of Simeon the Just. In Talmudic literature, the term may be applied to any interpreter of the Law from Moses to the period just before the compilation of the MishnaMishna
, in Judaism, codified collection of Oral Law—legal interpretations of portions of the biblical books of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy and other legal material. Together with the Gemara, or Amoraic commentary on the Mishna, it comprises the Talmud.
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scribe

1. Old Testament a recognized scholar and teacher of the Jewish Law
2. Judaism a man qualified to write certain documents in accordance with religious requirements

Scribe

Augustin Eugène . 1791--1861, French author or coauthor of over 350 vaudevilles, comedies, and libretti for light opera

Scribe

A text-formatting language by Brian Reid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although he can sometimes appear overly dismissive of opposing arguments, the close attention to detail and inductive reasoning that Neidorf so painstakingly employs supplies convincing evidence about important questions such as the unity and dating of the poem as well as scribal practices and contemporary reception.
His inclusion of two poems thought to be written by the Queen allow May and Marotti to compare Hanson's copies with others, and to undertake a lengthy and fine-grained "micro reconstruction of the scribal network" in their regard.
52) Harold Love, The Culture and Commerce of Texts: Scribal Publication in Seventeenth-Century England (Amherst, 1998), 121.
Initial chapters deal adeptly with the place of formulae amongst other sources for the period, outlining questions of orality and literacy and highlighting the scribal mentality which is so important to Rio's methodology.
This scribal poetics lies at the center of Finkelstein's poetry.
In chapter five, Cyrus also offers an important contribution to the study of late-medieval women's devotion and scribal activity, which has often focused on the intellectual and literary impact of reform.
3) of the auspicious siddham sign, an old inheritance of Indic scribal tradition (see Griffiths and Southworth in Journal Asiatique 295, 2007, p.
When this happened, authorial anonymity (previously invoked as an appeal to godly objectivity) took on new meaning, as did unanticipated print and distribution of 'private' scribal texts.
Elizabeth's personal notations and emendations on official scribal documents expose her private reservations on matters of state, especially execution warrants.
Abbott Trithemius was passionate about preserving the scribal tradition and wanted to get his message to as many people as possible, as quickly as possible.
However, Veidlinger should not be criticised for what he did not do, when he does offer considerable insight into the intellectual and social history of monastic life in the region, and to the nature of scribal practices in general.
Each writer, whether by editorial urging or personal conviction (or both), attacks or at the very least seriously tweaks Eisenstein's argument that the shift from scribal copying to moveable type printing in the late fifteenth century constituted nothing less than a "communications revolution" (Eisenstein 1:25).