Scrooge


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Scrooge

“grasping old sinner” who learns that miserliness leads only to loneliness and pain. [Br. Lit.: “A Christmas Carol” in Benét, 196]
References in classic literature ?
As Scrooge looked fixedly at this phenomenon, it was a knocker again.
There was plenty of width for that, and room to spare; which is perhaps the reason why Scrooge thought he saw a locomotive hearse going on before him in the gloom.
Scrooge then remembered to have heard that ghosts in haunted houses were described as dragging chains.
It was long, and wound about him like a tail; and it was made (for Scrooge observed it closely) of cash-boxes, keys, padlocks, ledgers, deeds, and heavy purses wrought in steel.
Because,' said Scrooge, `a little thing affects them.
To sit, staring at those fixed glazed eyes, in silence for a moment, would play, Scrooge felt, the very deuce with him.
said Scrooge, returning quickly to the charge, for the reason just assigned; and wishing, though it were only for a second, to divert the vision's stony gaze from himself.
returned Scrooge, `I have but to swallow this, and be for the rest of my days persecuted by a legion of goblins, all of my own creation.
At this the spirit raised a frightful cry, and shook its chain with such a dismal and appalling noise, that Scrooge held on tight to his chair, to save himself from falling in a swoon.
It comes from other regions, Ebenezer Scrooge, and is conveyed by other ministers, to other kinds of men.
It was a habit with Scrooge, whenever he became thoughtful, to put his hands in his breeches pockets.
You must have been very slow about it, Jacob,' Scrooge observed, in a business-like manner, though with humility and deference.