scute


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scute

[skyüt]
(invertebrate zoology)
A cornified, epithelial, scalelike structure in lizards and snakes.
References in periodicals archive ?
These studies attributed larger scutes to males, whereas the smaller scutes with a central figure occupying almost 50% or less of the total diameter were referred to females of G.
Portions of liver, kidney, pectoral muscle, hind leg muscle, scutes, and claws were removed for analysis.
No difference in keratinolytic bacterial loads was observed between scute centers and sulci, a result consistent for both affected and unaffected tortoises.
Description Total range of values given first, followed by values for holotype in parentheses: dorsal-fin rays VIII-I, 21-24 (22); anal-fin rays II-I, 17-19 (18); pectoral-fin rays 18-21 (21); vertebrae 10 precaudal + 14 caudal; curved lateral-line scales 50-73 (69); straight lateral-line scales 0-16 (4); straight lateral-line scutes 24-41 (35); total scales + scutes in straight lateral line 32-47 (39); developed gill rakers 2-7 (3) upper, 14-17 (14) lower, 16-24 (17) total; rudimentary gill rakers 0-4 (4) upper, 0-3 (3) lower, 4-8 (7) total; rudimentary + developed gill rakers 20-25 (24) total.
17h), the bone under each scute area is highly inflated, producing considerably recessed sulci.
The simplest explanation is that its decorative technique was a local Bismarck Archipelago invention based on turtle scute stamps.
minor in having the vertebral scute wider than long rather than longer than wide.
Dorsal scute small, not extending posterior to level of DSP2 5 Dorsal scute large, extending posterior to level of DSP2 6 5.
Line was affixed to the transistor by using a cyanocrylate glue, looped through the scutes and glued to the other end of the transmitter.
In Chrysemys, Deirochelys, Emydoidea, Graptemys, Malaclemys, Pseudemys, and Trachemys, the gular scute sulci are present on the entoplastron in adults, but the humeral-pectoral is not.
scripta, melanism typically is seen in adult males and first appears in the plastral scutes, followed by encroachment onto the carapace and soft tissue of the head, neck, and legs (McCoy, 1966).