sea anemone


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sea anemone

(ənĕm`ənē'), any of the relatively large, predominantly solitary polyps (see polyp and medusapolyp and medusa,
names for the two body forms, one nonmotile and one typically free swimming, found in the aquatic invertebrate phylum Cnidaria (the coelenterates). Some animals of this group are always polyps, some are always medusae, and some exhibit both a polyp and a medusa
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) of the class Anthozoa, phylum Cnidaria. Unlike the closely related corals, these organisms do not have a skeleton. Sea anemones occur everywhere in the oceans, at all depths, but are particularly abundant in coastal waters. Many are beautifully colored (reds, pinks, yellows) and look like flowers when the oral, or feeding, end, equipped with many extensions called tentacles, is fully open. Some anemones are tiny, but most are from one to several inches (2.5–10 cm) long; the genus Stoichactis in the Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Australia may reach 3 ft (90 cm) in diameter at the expanded oral end. Most sea anemones attach temporarily to submerged objects; a few thrust themselves into the sand or live in furrows; a few are parasitic on other marine organisms. Some anemones feed on small particles, which are caught with the aid of a mucus secretion and moving currents that are set up by the tentacles. Most sea anemones are predaceous, immobilizing their prey with the aid of specialized stinging cells called nematocysts. Metridium is the genus most often studied in classrooms. The burrowing anemone, Cerianthuss, occurs on both Pacific and Atlantic coasts; some may reach nearly 2 ft (60 cm) in length. Sea anemones are classified in the phylum CnidariaCnidaria
or Coelenterata
, phylum of invertebrate animals comprising the sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids. Cnidarians are radially symmetrical (see symmetry, biological).
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, class Anthozoa, subclass Zoantharia.

sea anemone

[′sē ə‚nem·ə·nē]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of the 1000 marine cnidarians that constitute the order Actiniaria; the adult is a cylindrical polyp or hydroid stage with the free end bearing tentacles that surround the mouth.

sea anemone

any of various anthozoan coelenterates, esp of the order Actiniaria, having a polypoid body with oral rings of tentacles
References in periodicals archive ?
Like corals and jellyfish, the sea anemone -- Nematostella vectensis -- is a member of the Cnidaria family, which is over 700 million years old.
Other types of fish cannot hide or come near a sea anemone because their mouths are shielded with millions of cells that are filled with toxins and sting.
Yes, zebrafish and sea anemones are being used to study the origins of MS and to develop novel strategies for stopping the disease in its tracks and restoring function.
Making a sea anemone tentacle takes a bit of stretching.
Summary: Like a luminous Venus rising from the sea atop a half-shell, pearl-covered Chanel models in light, liquidy fabrics emerged from a giant sea anemone onto a catwalk transformed into an undersea kingdom.
Some sea anemone species live in a type of symbiosis (close, long-term relationship), called mutualism, with other animals (see Making Friends, far right).
You don't have to be Jacques Cousteau--or a sea anemone, for that matter--to understand the potential benefits of this burgeoning relationship.
SUBJECTS - above Sea anemone, inset left baked bean sea squirt PICTURES: PAUL NAYLOR
In Newport, I found a vacancy near the front door of the Hatfield Marine Science Center, which contained a Neptunian world inhabited by Deriq the giant Pacific octopus, candy-colored sea anemone and sea stars, and a wolf eel that refused its lunch during the public feeding.
They include maize for basic and applied research in plant biology, the Dioscorea true yams as a biological and evolutionary link between eudicots and grasses, the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectenis as an anthozoan model organism for studying comparative genomics and functional evolutionary biology, ants as models for social complexity, the parasitoid wasp Nasonia for haploid male genetics, and the rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus for mammalian reproduction and early embryology.
Prosthetics experts were told to come up with "bald albino things with tentacles like a sea anemone rather than a mouth".
The sea anemone and the snail, although highly associated, do not show evidence of large diet overlap.