season


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season

1. one of the four equal periods into which the year is divided by the equinoxes and solstices, resulting from the apparent movement of the sun north and south of the equator during the course of the earth's orbit around it. These periods (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) have their characteristic weather conditions in different regions, and occur at opposite times of the year in the N and S hemispheres
2. a period of the year characterized by particular conditions or activities
3. the period during which any particular species of animal, bird, or fish is legally permitted to be caught or killed
4. any of the major periods into which the ecclesiastical calendar is divided, such as Lent, Advent, or Easter
5. in season
a. (of game) permitted to be caught or killed
b. (of some female mammals) sexually receptive

Season

To dry wood through exposure to the air or the heat of a kiln, thus lowering its moisture content.

Season

 

(1) One of the four parts into which the year is divided—spring, summer, autumn, or winter.

(2) A part of the year characterized by a particular natural phenomenon, such as the rainy season, or customarily associated with a particular kind of work, such as the harvest season, or with a particular pastime or activity, such as the hunting season or health-resort season.

(3) The period during which theaters, concert halls, and other cultural facilities present their regular program of performances.

season

[′sēz·ən]
(climatology)
A division of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena, usually astronomical or climatic.
References in classic literature ?
The water was growing cooler as the season advanced.
One day I undertook a tour through the country, and the diversity and beauties of nature I met with in this charming season, expelled every gloomy and vexatious thought.
And we must contrive to get a peck of russet apples, late in the season as it is.
This old town of Salem -- my native place, though I have dwelt much away from it both in boyhood and maturer years -- possesses, or did possess, a hold on my affection, the force of which I have never realized during my seasons of actual residence here.
With a fair, fresh wind, the Pequod was now drawing nigh to these straits; Ahab purposing to pass through them into the Javan sea, and thence, cruising northwards, over waters known to be frequented here and there by the Sperm whale, sweep inshore by the Philippine Islands, and gain the far coast of Japan, in time for the great whaling season there.
When Lord George took Ginger for hunting, York shook his head; he said it ought to be a steady hand to train a horse for the first season, and not a random rider like Lord George.
That would often be ten or eleven o'clock, which was bad enough, in all conscience; but now, in the slack season, they would perhaps not have a thing for their men to do till late in the afternoon.
If you want to pay twelve hundred for a fellow, and use him right up in the press of the season, just to serve your own spite, it's no business of mine, I've done what I could for him.
Tom slipped out in good season with his aunt's old tin lantern, and a large towel to blindfold it with.
We notice with pleasure the arrival of visitors to this healthful and far-famed watering-place earlier in the season than usual during the present year.
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way--in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me.