secondary

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secondary

1. of or relating to the education of young people between the ages of 11 and 18
2. (of the flight feathers of a bird's wing) growing from the ulna
3. 
a. being the part of an electric circuit, such as a transformer or induction coil, in which a current is induced by a changing current in a neighbouring coil
b. (of a current) flowing in such a circuit
4. (of an industry) involving the manufacture of goods from raw materials
5. Geology (of minerals) formed by the alteration of pre-existing minerals
6. Chem
a. (of an organic compound) having a functional group attached to a carbon atom that is attached to one hydrogen atom and two other groups
b. (of an amine) having only two organic groups attached to a nitrogen atom; containing the group NH
c. (of a salt) derived from a tribasic acid by replacement of two acidic hydrogen atoms with metal atoms or electropositive groups
7. a secondary coil, winding, inductance, or current in an electric circuit
8. Ornithol any of the flight feathers that grow from the ulna of a bird's wing
9. Astronomy a celestial body that orbits around a specified primary body
10. Med a cancerous growth in some part of the body away from the site of the original tumour
11. American football
a. cornerbacks and safeties collectively
b. their area in the field
12. short for secondary colour

secondary

1. see primary.
2. Short for secondary crater.

secondary

[′sek·ən‚der·ē]
(electricity)
Low-voltage conductors of a power distributing system.
(electromagnetism)
(geology)
A term with meanings that changed from early to late in the 19th century, when the term was confined to the entire Mesozoic era; it was finally replaced by Mesozoic era.
References in periodicals archive ?
The trope of secondariness resounds in searingly regretful, plangent tones throughout the Aeneid.
They are as it were in solution in her vocabulary despite their secondariness.
Noting this secondariness of myth, Cornell argues for the feminist reliance upon myth to defend the feminine (Beyond Accommodation 165).
The identification of femaleness with secondariness, however, is not an historical constant, much less the occasion for a transhistorical frame.
The fantastically distracting appearance of this text forces recognition of the poem's battle between originality and secondariness, or more particularly, of the poem's contradictory attitude toward these standards.