secondary

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secondary

1. of or relating to the education of young people between the ages of 11 and 18
2. (of the flight feathers of a bird's wing) growing from the ulna
3. 
a. being the part of an electric circuit, such as a transformer or induction coil, in which a current is induced by a changing current in a neighbouring coil
b. (of a current) flowing in such a circuit
4. (of an industry) involving the manufacture of goods from raw materials
5. Geology (of minerals) formed by the alteration of pre-existing minerals
6. Chem
a. (of an organic compound) having a functional group attached to a carbon atom that is attached to one hydrogen atom and two other groups
b. (of an amine) having only two organic groups attached to a nitrogen atom; containing the group NH
c. (of a salt) derived from a tribasic acid by replacement of two acidic hydrogen atoms with metal atoms or electropositive groups
7. a secondary coil, winding, inductance, or current in an electric circuit
8. Ornithol any of the flight feathers that grow from the ulna of a bird's wing
9. Astronomy a celestial body that orbits around a specified primary body
10. Med a cancerous growth in some part of the body away from the site of the original tumour
11. American football
a. cornerbacks and safeties collectively
b. their area in the field
12. short for secondary colour

secondary

1. see primary.
2. Short for secondary crater.

secondary

[′sek·ən‚der·ē]
(electricity)
Low-voltage conductors of a power distributing system.
(electromagnetism)
(geology)
A term with meanings that changed from early to late in the 19th century, when the term was confined to the entire Mesozoic era; it was finally replaced by Mesozoic era.
References in periodicals archive ?
7] Is it not exactly this mysticism of contingency, or secondariness, that everyone recognizes and loves so much in the later painting of Claude Monet?
Having admitted his secondariness, the duke has to reestablish his indispensability as a critic.
When we examine the evidence offered by the two Gospels without any preconvictions as to priority, we must acknowledge that the secondariness of John to Luke is still unproven.
For a discussion of the status of Benjamin's "coming-to-legibility," as well as its implicit originary secondariness, and hence its textual ramifications, I must refer to the section on "Avbrottet" in my Det kritiska ogonblicket: Holderlin, Benjamin, Celan (Stockholm: Norstedts, 1991), 71-133.
You are not, as in the general discourse of generalization, presented with the first principle each time; the first principle is always in the space of secondariness.
He argues, however, that acting is a more useful metaphor to characterize the agency of readers, for while it captures the secondariness of a reader's response to a text, it also grants to readers a function both different from writing and yet of crucial importance.
32) This elaborate construction of secondariness, of Virgil's poetry to Homer's, is clearly of great importance to Virgil.
What if the scene were allowed to evoke what the thematic violence of the Oedipal narrative serves violently to suppress: the secondariness of the phallus, the illusory quality that attends its demarcation of signifiers as representations of qualities as such, the fraudulence through which it articulates meaning by obscuring its own substitutive status as the thematic elaboration, within the order of thought, of the Thing that resists but occasions meaning while remaining, itself, unthinkable?
The whole poem is about the disruption caused by the signifier, the secondariness, the throwness of being in regard to language.
The supreme irony is that we Arabs are of this world, hooked into dependency and consumerism, cultural vassalage and technological secondariness, without much volition on our part.