secondary blast injuries

secondary blast injuries

[′sek·ən‚der·ē ¦blast ‚in·jə·rēz]
(ordnance)
Those injuries sustained from the indirect effects, such as falling rubble from a collapsed building, or missiles (debris or objects) which have been picked up by the generated winds and hurled against an individual; also includes injuries resulting from individuals being hurled against stationary objects.
References in periodicals archive ?
5,6 Secondary blast injuries resulting from the impact of high-velocity shrapnel and metallic fragments or from exogenous debris propelled by blast are the commonest ocular injuries sustained during combat environment.
Secondary blast injuries resulting from the impact of high velocity shrapnel and metallic fragments or from exogenous debris propelled by blast are the commonest ocular injuries sustained during combat environment1.
Secondary blast injuries occur from objects that have been energized by the explosion to become projectiles.
Secondary blast injuries are caused when flying objects including dirt, rocks, and shrapnel create penetrating and focal damage.
Mayo et al (3) reported that projectiles like steel balls, nails, screws and nuts packed around the explosive causes secondary blast injuries and the wounds reflect their velocity and shape.
Secondary blast injuries occur from fragment objects that have been energized by the explosion to become projectiles.
The term "primary blast injury" refers to direct injuries sustained from blast waves, while flying debris from a blast can also lead to trauma and secondary blast injuries [5].
8) Secondary blast injuries due to fragments are the leading cause of death and injury in both military and civilian terrorist attacks.
In urban areas, 80-85 per cent of all secondary blast injuries are caused by flying glass.