secondary combustion

secondary combustion

The unintentional combustion of fuel beyond the outlet of a furnace.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore, the heat release takes place and completes substantially within this chamber, so that only already burned gas issues through the connecting channels, which transfers heat to the main cylinder via mass transfer, mixing, conduction and convection rather than by a secondary combustion process;
They mix with air and reach into the secondary combustion zone where the temperature is about 1100[degrees]C.
Contract awarded for Tongyeong Environmental Recycling Center incineration plant Unit 1 Replacement secondary combustion chamber
Look for a well-designed unit that utilizes secondary combustion, because they burn more efficiently and can be a good home heating option in rural areas.
This hybrid stove has a catalytic combustor and a secondary combustion system.
As part of the agreement, Clean Harbors has also committed to conduct an environmental project, valued at $750,000, routing hazardous emissions from hazardous waste storage tanks to the secondary combustion chamber.
In order to comply with emission standards, Clean Harbors also committed to a $750,000 overhaul of some of its facility, routing emissions from hazardous waste storage tanks to a secondary combustion chamber.
The amount of this substance substantially decreases if the combustion chamber is reasonably heat-insulated and secondary air mixes in the flame at a certain distance above the grate, which allows the final burning of the as-yet unburned gases by secondary combustion.
Washington, July 15 (ANI): In a case study, a scientist has found that modern woodstoves, with the advanced secondary combustion systems, are now 95 percent more efficient than their predecessors.
Every evening we lounge around in its luxurious warmth and watch the curly yellow flames as its advanced non-catalytic system re-burns flue gases - known as secondary combustion - resulting in particulate emissions less than 3 grams per hour.
But it's tricky to do, since secondary combustion occurs at and above 1,100 degrees and requires a lot of oxygen which is generally not available near the burning wood, since the wood is still eating up all the oxygen that comes its way to sustain primary ignition.