secret key


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Related to secret key: secret key cryptography

secret key

An encryption key that is kept concealed. Its discovery voids the security of the encryption session. A secret key generally refers to the key in a secret-key cryptography system, in which both sides use the same key. It may also refer to the private key in a public key cryptography system, because the private key must also be kept "secret." See secret-key cryptography and public key cryptography.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, the data owner distributes the secret key S[K.
After that, the encrypted information is decrypted with the help of shared secret key (i.
Thus, although node 6 will not use this specific route for establishing a secret key with one of its peers, when discussing the security of the established secret common randomness between two other peers sharing this route, node 6 will be considered a possible eavesdropper (i.
The secret key is generated through two phases namely as the initialization phase and the secret key generation phase, the details of which are as follows:
The study shows that only few cryptographic schemes that have implemented forward secrecy are used in the protection of EMRs, and very few of them use the forward secure secret key encryption scheme (FSSKES).
Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of encryption with good results in the histograms, large space of keys, and high sensitivity at secret key, which are similar to the results obtained by us in this work.
In encryption, a secret key is applied to a message to change its content in a particular way.
Hollies, 230 New Ridley Road, Stocksfield, Northumberland is for sale through Secret Key at PS2m, tel: 01434 632 187.
In the first the source node encrypts the message using a secret key and the destination node decrypts the message using the same key.
The term "pad" in the name of Algorithm, derived from the earlier implementations, where the secret key material was distributed as pad of paper, due to its easy destruction (Wikipedia, 2012).