secular

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Related to secularized: secularisation

secular

1. of an education, etc.
a. having no particular religious affinities
b. not including compulsory religious studies or services
2. (of clerics) not bound by religious vows to a monastic or other order
3. Astronomy occurring slowly over a long period of time
4. a member of the secular clergy

secular

(sek -yŭ-ler) Continuing or changing over a long period of time.

secular

[′sek·yə·lər]
(engineering)
Of or pertaining to a long indefinite period of time.
References in periodicals archive ?
The experience of being dispersed into a secularized society is the most prominent feature of religion's present-day situation.
But if the early-modern work of knowing eventually resulted in a secularized historical-scientific discourse by which we now render our encounters with the unknown intelligible, what was that period's own epistemology of discovery?
The presidential address looks at Al-Farabi: an Arabic account of the origin of language and of philosophical vocabulary, and the Aquinas medalist is on being a theistic philosopher in a secularized culture.
In Warsaw, where he celebrated Holy Mass with one million people, he encouraged his audience to remain faithful to the Catholic faith and defend its influence in a secularized Europe.
After two years of heated controversy over the omission of any mention of Christianity in the proposed new constitution for the European Union, the final text adopted in Brussels on June 18 was the secularized version.
19) resentment of secularized Jewry's responsibility for a secularized America is probably symbolic of middle-American sentiment.
The pope called on church leaders to make the gospel attractive both to traditional indigenous cultures and to modern secularized populations.
But by ignoring the rest of Forte's argument--that radicalized Islamic governments and the millions who share their views are persecuting millions of Christians worldwide--Bush essentially secularized the movement's theology, to the dismay of its proponents.
By the end of the 1920s, casework and psychiatry emerged as tools to distinguish "professional," "good," or "formal" social work from volunteerism; to distance the activities of what was "generally a white person's job" from similar ones connected to religious institutions in racial and ethnic communities; and to exalt objectivity in a white secularized space.
Noble tells us that there are those for whom the religious impulse is unconscious and obscured by secularized vocabulary.
But it is a symbol of a radical divide, easier to see in a society more profoundly secularized than ours.
7, concluding that Christmas, while considered a religious holiday by many Americans, has become secularized and therefore raises no constitutional concerns as a government holiday.