segregated ice

segregated ice

[′seg·rə‚gād·əd ′īs]
(hydrology)
Ice films, seams, lenses, rods, or layers generally 0.04 to 6 inches (1 to 150 millimeters) thick that grow in permafrost by drawing in water as the ground freezes. Also known as Taber ice.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the cores we examined, the transition zone often exhibited cryoturbation; abundant segregated ice in the form of lenses, veins, and a reticulate fabric; mixed organic matter in the form of patches, involutions, and layers; and a platy structure (Fig.
Because of the accumulation of segregated ice and organic matter, the transition zone often has greater water content than the active layer.
Identification was primarily based on the occurrence of cryoturbation and redistributed organic carbon below the contemporary active layer, an abundance of segregated ice as lenses and veins forming a net-like structure, and a higher amount of soil moisture than in the overlying active layer.