Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Neonatal abstinence syndrome after in utero exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in term infants.
Major Finding: ALKS 5461 was effective in 32 patients with major depressive disorder who failed to respond adequately to treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.
Serotonin is the target of the popular antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which prolong the effect of serotonin in the brain.
Washington, July 05 (ANI): A new study has suggested that children born to women who take certain antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, during the first trimester of pregnancy may modestly increase the risk of developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
The undesirable interaction involves a specific class of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, which include such drugs as Zoloft, Paxil, Lexapro, or Prozac.
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed antidepressants, and influence the way you feel, act and behave by altering brain chemistry.
Although the findings are too small to arrive at a conclusion, a new study has found that mothers who take atypical (second-generation) antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) take longer to produce breast milk than mothers who do not take the drugs.
Your article on the controversy surrounding selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (1) is very much appreciated by many people.
The overall use of antidepressants and the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increased sharply from 1996 to 2004, when both trends plateaued.
So I was really surprised when I read the article on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and birth defects.
Food and Drug Administration released a public health advisory in November that tells doctors to weigh the risks and benefits of prescribing selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors before prescribing them to pregnant women.

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