selenography

(redirected from selenographers)
Also found in: Dictionary.

selenography

(sel-ĕ-nog -ră-fee) The study of the Moon's physical features. See Moon, surface features.

Selenography

 

the branch of astronomy concerned with the description of the surface of the moon. As new methods of studying the moon develop, the term “selenography” is being supplanted by the terms “selenodesy” and “selenology.”

selenography

[‚sel·ə·näg·rə·fē]
(astronomy)
Studies pertaining to the physical geography of the moon; specifically, referring to positions on the moon measured in latitude from the moon's equator and in longitude from a reference meridian.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) But we should pause here to acknowledge briefly the contribution made by those early British selenographers whose work contributed to the emergence of three themes that, as this address will argue, came to distinguish later British lunar study and define its essential character.
Early selenographers also gave designations to the lunar bright areas.
8) Almost forty pages in length, the report is a monument to painstaking visual observation undertaken by Birt and several other contributing selenographers, notably T.
At the annual meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science held at Norwich in 1868 August, the German selenographer J.
It is interesting to note at this point the apparent absence from the discussion of one of the most respected selenographers of the 19th century, Johann Friedrich Julius Schmidt (1825-1884), whose Chart der Gebirge des Mondes, Berlin 1878, is generally regarded as the pinnacle of 19th century selenography.
There will be references to the early selenographers and the inherent difficulties which they encountered in their efforts at cartography in the higher latitudes, but I have to admit that material available for an adequate discussion is scanty at this end.
The greatest of all classic selenographers, the German Johann Madler, named it after his friend and countryman Alexander von Humboldt, who explored uncharted regions of the Earth.
Wilkins was neither hero nor villain, but a man whose love of lunar cartography was, paradoxically, both driven and impaired by values and judgements that may now seem misplaced, but which seemed perfectly acceptable to selenographers of his era.
A hundred years ago selenographers called this external wreath a glacis, which is the slope that provides a buffer between a castle's walls and the ground.
Most early selenographers considered the variety of crater morphologies to represent fundamentally different types of structures.
Classical selenographers considered it an "imperfect ring" and generally ignored it.
Classical selenographers widely debated the origin of these rays.